Bevin Hernandez Keynote: Culture & Engagement

Bevin Hernandez, Project Manager, Penn State

“You have installed your Enterprise 2.0 solution. Now you’re wondering, “what’s next?” Bevin answers that question by explaining what to include in your strategy to realize Enterprise 2.0’s business value as well as the uncommon approach taken by Penn State Outreach to transform their organization.”

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • Explains the impact on the business of three different types of employees: highly engaged, basically engaged, actively disengaged.
  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs is key to orgs and plays into using social media.  It doesn’t address biological or security needs.  However, it does address the need for relationships and the ability to achieve self-actualization.
  • They took a look at networks and their value. They found that networks can break down when nodes break. However, a network built on a foundation of triadic relationships proved to be very stable.
  • They created a graphic: on the horizontal axis you track social engagement, on the vertical axis you track purpose.
    • Lost – they have no purpose and aren’t social
    • Social Butterfly – they are all social but lack purpose
    • Type A “All work, no play” – they have lots of purpose/focus, but aren’t social
    • Magic – they have clear purpose/focus and are social
  • You can help people move horizontally/vertically to another quadrant, but you cannot move people diagonally. To help them move by providing support.
  • Social Butterflies can be moved to the Magic quadrant by helping connect them to purpose. Highlight the stories that explain the purpose and motivate change.
  • The “Lost” can move either to the Social Butterfly quadrant (to create connections) or to Type A (by giving them the tools that make them more productive and make their lives easier).
  • UPenn is using (and clearly loving) ThoughtFarmer.
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Tony Zingale Keynote: The Biggest “From>To” in Business in a Generation

Tony Zingale , Chief Executive Officer, Jive Software

Title: The Biggest “From > To” in Business in a Generation

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • Beware of Ignoring the social business imperative
    • The consumer web is forcing innvoation – you can no longer elect to wait and see
    • Customers are demanding social
    • Employees are demanding social
  • The ground is shifting under the enterprise:
    • management > engagement
    • email > collaboration
    • customer relationship management > community
    • baby boomers > millennials
    • User Interface > User Experience – now the focus is on fun and ease of use not how a form is constructed. You cannot ignore the impact of Apple and tech design.
    • what chatters > what matters
  • Jive has good case studies in Nike and Charles Schwab
  • Make sure you connect your social media strategy either to a top line or bottom line goal.
  • What’s the new way to business?
    • Engage employees, engage customers, engage social web. But Jive believes that the lines between these are blurring. Therefore, you need to provide a single-point of access to all the internal and external social stream.
  • They are recommending that their clients focus on small, light-weight, temporary (almost disposable) apps that allow you to target specific business goals.
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SONY Keynote: Going Social With SharePoint

James Whitmoyer, Business Applications Manager, Sony

Title:  Going Social with SharePoint at Sony

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • Initial focus of this presentation was on the external social media efforts.
  • How do they bring social media internally?  Marketing to employees is similar to marketing to customers?
  • He noted that they are using SharePoint, but it doesn’t look like SharePoint.
  • They use My Sites as a way for employees to build their own brand within Sony
  • Use Office Communicator with presence to connect employees while reducing e-mail.
  • They encourage people to create “My Sites” by featuring best pictures from individual My Sites on a central site called “Sony Source.”
  • They are encourage every employee to blog.  They search through My Sites to find and promote interesting blogs.  Many employees are blogging about work-related content rather than leisure activities.
  • They have included an activity stream via SP 2010. This is a more effective way for teams to be in touch – they prefer it to e-mail.
  • They encourage employees to build their own brand
  • They have a virtual org chart that shows where everyone sits in the food chain and other colleagues who might be able to help. This has led to a huge improvement in responding to queries.
  • Why does this matter?
  • Externally, this provides a better way to reach customers where they spend their time
  • Internally it reflects how people live in their private lives.  Therefore, it improves personal productivity.
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Christian Finn Keynote: Microsoft’s 7 Essential E2.0 Truths

Christian Finn, Director of Product Management, SharePoint, Microsoft Corporation

Title: On Becoming a Connected Enterprise: The Seven Essential Truths Microsoft Has Discovered So Far

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • This is billed as a discussion of Microsoft’s culture rather than their products
  • The focus is on responding to their “e-mail addicted” culture
  • Their challenge was how to connect their people across geographies and timezones.
  • What is are the key needs of their employees?
  • Keep up with productsm markets and technology
  • Share real world knowledge
  • Help people connect with colleagues and friends within the enterprise.
  • Their solution is an enterprise podcast collection called “AcademyMobile”
  • It is completely community governed.  With a couple of clicks, everyone within Microsoft can post their podcast. There are no workflow or corporate approvals required. This is completely open.
  • Content is unproduced, unrehearsed – very authentic. In the process, participants share something about themselves.
  • The podcasts are posted directly on their internal SharePoint system. You can find these quickly, see them and rate them.  You can also connect with the podcaster via IM or other quick connection tools.
  • Make it easy to participate – they eliminate barriers to entry by giving free tools to podcasters in exchange to a certain number of podcasts per month on any topic you want.
  • They raised awareness of the solution. It they an evolving internal marketing campaign to recruit participants. Once it got big enough, they moved from guerilla, ad hoc marketing to formal marketing campaigns.
  • They give rewards – podcasters get points for the number of podcasts contributed and the number viewed. Originally, they focused on their technical content and offered rewards that appealed to geeks. Now they offer a wider range of rewards (e.g., complete dining room furniture) and are even now letting podcasters translate their awards into charitable gifts.
  • Once executives saw the impact of this program, senior executives realized that this is where employees were spending their time and these executives started making their own podcasts. [Employees can rate Steve Ballmer’s podcasts.  Do you think he ever gets a poor rating???]
  • How do they measure value?
    • How many podcasts are uploaded to the system?
    • How many views are there?
    • Size of audience (over 50% of the employee population, over 95% of the sales force)
  • Benefit: Spreading a wealth of knowledge in a way that goes well beyond what the internal formal training department cannot match – even with the resources of Microsoft behind
  • Seven Truths:
    • Focus on the need, not the technology
    • Be a silo buster
    • The solution belongs to the users – it doesn’t work in a command-and-control way. If it is done top-down, you have to compel participation. If it’s bottom up, people self-select and much more effective
    • What’s in a name? The platform/program should have a distinct name, look and personality. (If it had been just another SharePoint site, it would not have achieved the same level of visibility and interest.)
    • Start small, grow fast. They just wanted to help a few communicate and connect. They didn’t intend to create a video backbone.
    • Bring in everybody. Make sure you give ways for various types of participants  – contributors, commenters, raters, etc.
    • Value? They actually didn’t make a hard ROI business case before launching the program.  However, they have since be able to establish lots of business value.  It speaks for itself.
    • Mileage will vary – not every E2.0 effort will have the same impact.  You need to really calibrate your methods and branding to your goals.
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The Dark Side of Enterprise 2.0

Greg Lowe and Kathleen Culver gave a reprise of their much-praised presentation first given at the E2.0 Conference in San Francisco.

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • Constant electronic connection provides lots of well-known benefits
    • Gives flexibility
    • Reduces need to travel
  • However, there is a downside – and that’s the Dark Side of E2.0
    • You are constantly interrupted
    • You lose the flow
    • There is less downtime – required to respond constantly
    • less play
    • put your close relationships at risk
    • problem of burnout from being “on” 24/7
    • poor performance – interruptions distract you and make you less able to perform – almost as if you had too much to drink
  • Cites Tony Schwartz’ The Way We Are Working Isn’t Working
    • We aren’t computers that can stay “on” all the time
    • High performers have a particular pattern to their work – they have periods of deep focus followed by downtime — even they don’t try to perform at a peak level 24/7
  • Because we can use E2.0 to avoid travel, we can work remotely.  This means that we don’t meet in person as much any more. This leads
    • to more misunderstanding because we miss subtle non-verbal clues
    • it is harder to achieve comaraderie and a sense of rapport with out colleagues.
  • Part of how we absorb information is involves more than just ingesting raw data – we absorb  information better when we have other physical sensations at the same time (you remember better what someone tells you when you are holding a cup of hot coffee in the cafeteria – more inputs -than when you are reading an e-mail without other physical sensation)
  • Cites Daniel Goleman’s work on mirror neurons, which are important for our ability to empathize.  University of Michigan study reports that there has been a 40% decline in the empathy of college students in the last 20 years due to the fact that they interact remotely more frequently.
  • Why should a company care? Comraderie and rapport are correlated to loyalty.  Empathy helps build comraderie and rapport.
  • New 2.0 venues give us broader input/perspective, multlingual advantages, opportunities to buildcorporate knowledge and creates new corporate behaviors and culture.
  • new 2.0 venues can lead to “Exposure Bias.”  Because not every employee will be able to master these new 2.0 venues, the ones that do will enjoy the benefits of visibility (exposure).  The quiet ones will be crowded out. The ones who contribute and participate will have more perceived popularity and expertise.  Will this lead people to game the system in order to drive up their rankings? This isn’t the desired behavior – we need the true experts participating.
  • Old behaviors then appear in “new clothes” – for example, managers press gang people into their communities in order to show higher participation numbers even though these people haven’t joined for the right reasons and most likely won’t add value
  • E2.0 can provide easy access to information.  Greg Lowe calls this the “information candy store.”  The downside of this is information overload.  This can lead to huge loss of productivity.
  • Citing Daniel Schwartz’ work on The Paradox of Choice – the more choice we have, the higher the stakes regarding the decision, yet we tend to lose confidence in our ability to make a good choice.
  • With too much information, even the most careful, focused person can fall into analysis paralysis in a good faith attempt to make a good decision.
  • The biggest risks of E2.0:
    • loss of productivity
    • risk of burnout
    • negative impact on the quality of decisions
    • threats to employee morale and happiness
  • However, the Dark Side still can’t be quantified.  Therefore, E2.0 is still safe from business case risks – however, there is a risk to individuals.
  • How do you mitigate the impact of the Dark Side?
    • Avoid “alert fatigue”
    • Unplug yourself
    • Make an effort to meet in person as often as possible
    • Remember the ‘wallflowers” – make sure you’re engaging with the folks who are less likely to jump into E2.0
    • Improve your ability to filter the noise – this is not a one-time action. As your priorities change, you need to change your filters so that only the most relevant information comes through the filter.
  • This advice is like “eat healthy and exercise.” In other words, it’s easier saiid than done.
  • For example, we get addicted to Alerts becase we get a little rush when someone gives us a good comment on our work or our activity stream.
  • We fear loss of reputation if we aren’t always active and recognized as an expert.
  • We don’t want to be seen as non-responsive.
  • Immunity to change – it’s extremely hard to makes these changes.  We have habits for how we work.  While it is possible to change habits, this requires real mental focus. Unfortunately, multitasking has a negative impact on our ability to must the level of focus and persistence necessary to change habits.
  • Citing [Daniel Segal called Blindside]
  • Citing Barbara Ehrenreidt Brightsiding – about the relentless flood of positive information that masks the real issues and helps people avoid the thought, analysis and discussions that are necessary to actually achieve true rather than fake positive results.
  • Focus: We are responsible for what we pay attention to.  What we attend to is what we remember and shapes who we are and what we are able to achieve.  Therefore, pay attention to your attention – just as much as you pay attention to your health and your money.
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Gentry Underwood Keynote:Innovation Through E2.0

Gentry Underwood, Head of Knowledge Sharing, IDEO

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • They focus on “design thinking” = human-centered design.
  • Three key principles of Design:
    • Empower people, not ideas – ideas are cheap
    • Create platforms for coalescence – give people a place to be together and work together.
      • They have a wiki system organized around groups, they have a blog effort that is a rich source of new ideas, etc.
    • Facilitate and Reward Participation.  Every little bit of friction in the system impedes participation.
      • They are maniacal about eliminating friction in the system.
      • Bring information to people. Don’t make them go find it. (They use a feed system for this.)
      • They display their activity stream on the wall of the office – it encourages people update their stream. This provides built-in rewards
  • Good design coupled with good technology will change the culture, which will in turn change they way an org works and what it produces.
  • They used a platform from existing software with a custom interface. They are moving to a mGenera platform.
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Andrew McAfee Keynote: The State of Enterprise 2.0

Andrew McAfee, Principal Research Scientist, Center for Digital Business, MIT Sloan School of Management.

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • The State of the Art
    • Citing various analysts and consults who assure us that E2.0 is heating up
  • Four Tensions of E2.0
    • What’s the goal of the effort? Are you trying to build a “Cargo Cult” or .Infrastructure?
      • Are you going through the motions or are you really ttrying to transform how you work? Are you just deploying disparate tools and hoping that abundance will come?  However, if you really wantall the benefits, you have to build the infrastructure to  support the new way of working.
    • Are you focused on the Inner or Outer Rings? (Strong ties, weak ties or potential ties) Historically, we have focused our effort on building on strong ties, ignoring the vast opportunity available with our potential and weak ties. New technology now can help change this.
    • Direction: HiPPO or Superorganism? (HiPPO = highest paid person in the org OR highest paid person’s opinion).
      • New approach is superorganism such as an ant colony. (See E.O. Wilson on this.)  Their ways of interacting are the polar opposit of the typical org chart.  Yet they are tremendously effective.
    • Assumption: Stability or Flux?  We used to focus on standardization.  Now we need to focus on flexibility and dynamism – in the right context. You don’t want too much fluidity when it comes to your surgery or how your car is built.  You do want fluidity in the way people interact with each other and with information.
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Lem Lasher Keynote: The C Perspective

Lem Lasher is CSC’s Chief Innovation Officer. CSC is a global tech and business services company.

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • They have a corporate-wide office of innovation.
  • They learned early that it is hard to get a good focus on innovation because there are many competing/diffuse definitions of innovation.
  • Can’t just focus on idea creation.  You also need the intellectual rigor and discipline to translate great ideas into practical business solutions and then deliver them.
  • Four themes of their innovation strategy: leadership, process, governance, enablement.
  • Paradox: really good management will kill innovation because good managers are trained to eliminate risk.
  • Good managers shouldn’t focus on individual innovators; instead focus on creating a good environment for innovation.
  • Look at innovation as part of an entire system — need to attend to innovators, customers, external partners
  • They enable and facilitate — rather managing in a command-and-control way
  • They focus on NEXT Practices rather than BEST practices
    • He says that if you implement best practices you just as good as the next guy.  BUT you need to be better.
  • E2.0 has taken off in CSC, based on a Jive platform. Nearly 50% of the employees are active on it.
  • Lem Lasher ended by announcing Clare Flanagan’s promotion. Nice!
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The Human Network @ Work

Keynote by Murali Sitaram and Jim Grubb of Cisco

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • Bringing poeple together through collaborative platforms is what CISCO calls the human network @ work.
    • Powered by the People
    • Constantly Evolving
    • It is Enterprise-wide
    • It extends beyond corporate boundaries to external partners
  • [Demo of CISCO Quad]
  • They are planning on having as many community spaces in Quad as there are mailing lists within the org
  • Includes an activity stream, unified message, calendar widget, profiling tool, one-click WebEx session start [of course!], allows microblogging updates that can be posted internally and externally.
    • They set some system wide limitations so, for example, there are no forbidden external communications that would contravene Federal securities laws.
  • When a phone call comes in, you can trigger a profile screen on the caller that includes org structure and reporting structure
  • Unified Communication
    • They have Unified Communication that provide internal information and integrates with external search as well
    • It integrates thousands of community spaces
    • They can automatically transcribe video so that it is searchable — allowing word search within the video.  They call this MediaNote.
    • They also transcode this so it is accessible via any device (e.g., handheld, TV)
    • Allows expertise location and immediate IM experience with the expert you’ve just located.
  • The platform respects organizational policy and security
  • The iPad and iPhone will support CISCO Quad
  • They claim that Quad will let you deliver any info to any device at any time
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JP Rangaswami E2.0 Conference Keynote

JP Rangaswami is the CIO and Chief Scientist at British Telecom

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • What’s the challenge for the next seven years?
    • The loss of control
      • The organization has to design for a loss of control
      • IT is facing loss of control too. The age of the locked down desktop is ending. Now users can bring their own tools to the office.
      • It’s easy to admit we’ve lost control of the device – much harder to face the implications of losing control of the data.
      • The act of trying to restrict/control something that is meant to be abundant results in an equal and greater effort to restore abundance. E.g., wikileaks.
      • Once info is made digital, it will leak.
    • The loss of the understanding of where the boundaries of the enterprise are
      • Consider what percentagge of emails actually leave your organization
      • Everything that happens inside the organization is cost – to raise revenue, you need to interact outside the organization
      • In this context, why do we spend so much time and money to keep information inside?

      The loss of of intelligence

      • Are these tools making us dumb?
      • Are the tools making organizations dumb? Are we providing tools that prevent true comprehension? E.g., PowerPoint anyone?
      • Does an individual lose personal skills while gaining the skills of the collective?
      • How do we design for collective expertise?
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