Look At Yourself

Hello everybody!
Look at yourself.  Now back to me.
Now back at yourself.  Now back to me.
Sadly… you are not a Monster.

[A MONSTER????!!!]

Those are the words of Sesame Street’s engaging blue monster, Grover, spoken in a clever twist on the now-famous Old Spice Man television commercial. (See below) These videos show examples of an eye-catching monster (or man, as the case may be) and then ask you to contrast your humdrum existence (or man) with what might be if you were a bit more blue or he were a bit more studly.

In each case, you are invited to indulge in that all too human tendency to compare your situation to that of another. In the face of such monster (or masculine) superiority, is it any wonder that we find ourselves believing that the grass is in fact greener on the other side?

Lately, law firm knowledge managers have been comparing themselves to project managers, alternative fee wizards and marketing mavens.  This exercise has left many feeling just a little inadequate and a touch insecure.  Nonetheless, the answer to that uncomfortable feeling is not to jump on the nearest bandwagon.  Rather, it is to think more strategically about the value you bring to your organization. Focus on your core competencies.  What do you do better than anyone else? Then think about which of your abilities and activities provide high impact with relatively little effort. If you need some help sorting your high-value activities from the low-value ones, follow the advice of Oz Benamram and try placing all your activities on an Effort-Impact Grid. Done correctly, this will help you improve your ability to deliver value to and have an impact on your organization.

You may not be a blue monster, but with this information in hand you should understand better how to be exactly what your firm needs.

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3 thoughts on “Look At Yourself

  • November 5, 2010 at 3:12 pm
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    I especially love the line “the man your man could smell like”.

  • November 5, 2010 at 4:42 pm
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    That's a clever way to make their point without over promising. Not

    surprisingly, it's been a very effective ad.

    – Mary

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