Collaboration Between KM and Marketing #ArkKM

Session Title and Description: KM & Marketing: True Partnership or Marriage of Convenience?

Law firm marketing departments regularly collaborate with lawyers to produce events, publications, pitch materials and more. The attorneys add context to the core functions of Marketing. Interestingly, that sounds a lot like KM’s goal of transforming information into knowledge by adding context. Is it possible that Marketing and KM have more in common than other administrative departments, and that intra-departmental collaboration can create an exponential value boost in a law firm? Our panel of Marketing and KM professionals will discuss collaborative successes as well as failures and the consequences of silo’d departments. How can KM and Marketing make CRM a success? How can business and client intelligence fuel both disciplines? Can KM and Marketing succeed at creating new product offerings? Is the elusive after-action review attainable through collaboration?

Speakers: 

Scott Rechtschaffen, Chief Knowledge Officer, Littler Mendelson P.C.,
Laura G. Murray, Esq., Chief Marketing Officer, Bilzin Sumberg,
Brad Newman, Practice Innovation Manager, Cooley LLP

[These are my notes from the 2015 Ark Group Conference: Knowledge Management in the Legal Profession.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Ways in which Marketing and KM Collaborate.
    • KM creates materials that marketing then distributes to clients and potential clients.
    • KM supports Marketing in conference planning and presentations.
    • KM and Marketing collaborate on deal data. Cooley provides data visualization tools to the public so that they can interpret this data.
    • Build databases that enable data analysis and collaboration. For example, allow Marketing and KM to share the experience database.
  • How to overcome barriers to this collaboration?
    • Marketing likes to control the message. Therefore, they are reluctant to allow lawyers to present directly to the public — especially via social media. Marketing does not control lawyer communications in the course of matters, when speaking to clients, when filing with governmental agencies, when appearing before the court. So why not trust lawyers on social media?
    • A key issue is awareness: each department may not be aware of what the other department is doing and what its priorities are. Along with awareness, the departments need to provide transparency into their processes.
    • Be willing to share credit (or assume the blame) for collaborative efforts.
  • CRM. Implementing a truly useful client relationship management system has been a challenge for many firms. At Cooley, the KM department has supported Marketing in finding better workflow and better ways to extract and analyze data lodged in Salesforce. While Marketing may know how to use a CRM well, Rechtschaffen believes that most lawyers don’t know how to use the tools. At Bilzin, KM owns the CRM system, not Marketing. This makes sense for Murray since KM is more focused on maintaining the integrity of the data. (She believes that Marketers are more on the “art” side, while KMers are more on the “science” side of this equation.) The key issue is to show the attorneys every day of the data that is in the CRM system. This motivates them to add their own data.
    • Alicia Hardy of White & Case commented that it can be divisive to have one department “own” a system. It is far better to have the firm itself “own” each system, but then involve all the relevant support functions in implementing it and enhancing it.
  • Keys to collaboration. Make sure that there is a constant discussion between KM and Marketing. Each KM attorney may be assigned to a practice group, but a marketing manager will be too. Make sure they are talking and finding ways to collaborating. Each should feed the other with new ideas. Each should provide implementation support to the other. Make sure that at the grassroots level they are interacting professionally and, even, socially. Have coffee. Have lunch.
  • Create infrastructure. At Littler, they assign a marketing professional to every KM initiative. This ensures that both departments create awareness and transparency. It also creates important relationships that make the work better.

 

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