Infinite Energy KM

cat-98359_1920We know that a cat always lands on its feet. We also know that a slice of toast always lands buttered side down. So what happens when you attach a slice of toast (buttered side up, of course) to the back of a cat and then toss both out the window?  Does the cat land on its feet or is it completely overcome by the force of the buttered bread? This puzzle is known as the buttered cat paradox and has spawned a host of interesting and sometimes comical responses. For my money, the folks at Flying Horse came up with the best answer: the tension between landing on feet versus landing buttered side down causes the cat to spin. This results in the infinite energy generator. Brilliant!

What does this have to do with law firm knowledge management?

In 2006, Chris Boyd and Ron Friedmann wrote an article advocating that law firm knowledge management professionals spend their time and energy in a more effective way. Their article, Powering a KM Windmill, recommended that we move away from KM activities that are heavily dependent on human effort (i.e., treadmill activities) and focus instead on KM activities that derive their energy from existing firm processes (i.e., windmill activities):

A practical and achievable way to maximize KM results is to capitalize on existing law firm information flows and business processes. By doing so, a firm can get the greatest possible “K” returns for a reasonable “M” effort. Think of a windmill rather than a treadmill. Whereas a treadmill keeps turning only via human effort (analogous to PSLs) or dedicated power from a generator (analogous to KM-specific software), a windmill relies on dependable winds (analogous to work flows and processes that exist independent of KM requirements).

Boyd and Friedmann were building on an earlier article by Dan Felean in which he laid out a slightly different treadmill / windmill dichotomy:

Knowledge management will not thrive as a separate process. Most KM experts now predict that KM will soon lose its separate identity, as it becomes embedded or “baked” within existing work systems. Mario D’Amico, chief technology strategist at PensEra Knowledge Technologies, describes this “knowledge funneling” approach as resembling a windmill rather than a treadmill. “Instead of constantly prodding the user to contribute tremendous effort (the treadmill), we must attach or embed the means for contribution and usage within existing lawyer work processes, so knowledge is funneled naturally from work,” he says. “By blending KM contribution and consumption with the daily attorney workflow, the process can gain more participation and become self-sustaining, propelled by natural processes–like a windmill.”

In either case, the focus was on spending your time and energy wisely in pursuit of your knowledge management goals.

Of course, all of this got me thinking. Clearly, being tied to a treadmill is a modern equivalent to being a galley slave. But is the windmill the right answer? While a windmill may be easier than a treadmill for the humans involved, how do you produce results on days that are not windy? Wouldn’t it in fact be better to create a system that was more like a watermill? The beauty of the water-powered wheel is that it will turn as long as the water is flowing. In most cases, this flow will be constant and steady — unlike the wind in many locales. Yet, even in this case, constant energy is not guaranteed. Someone could construct a dam upstream. Or a drought could cause the water to dry up.

Enter the buttered cat paradox. If you watch the Flying Horse video below, you’ll see how they created an infinite energy generator by putting the buttered cat paradox to work. Without a doubt, an infinite energy generator is far superior to a treadmill, windmill or watermill.

The question KM professionals should ask themselves with respect to every project is this:  are we setting up a process that relies on brute force (treadmill); periodic external energy (windmill); or near constant external energy, barring intervention upstream or climate change (watermill)? Or have we set up a system that will of its own accord create the energy necessary to make it self-perpetuating? If we can design projects that are self-perpetuating, then we will have found our KM equivalent of the infinite energy generator.

In a pinch, however, you could always use a buttered cat.

 

[Photo credit: Katzenspeilzeug]

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When Technologists are Challenged by Technology #ILTA13

ILTA13 It’s my good fortune to be attending the International Legal Technology Association’s 2013 Conference. The conference takes place this year at the Caesar’s Palace resort in Las Vegas. For a relative Las Vegas novice like me, everything here is a little larger than life — including the prices of food and drink. However, today’s main challenge was not expensive coffee. Rather, it was the WiFi.

Clay Gibney, ILTA’s unfailingly helpful IT Director, just sent a note to all attendees letting them know that his team and the hotel’s engineers are hard at work to improve the WiFi available in the conference areas. Since the ILTA conference focus is on education, I should not have been surprised by the fact that his email was itself highly educational as far as I was concerned. For example, I learned that the Hotspot/ MiFi devices of the few can disrupt the WiFi of the many. I also learned that, even in 2013, the best safety net is arriving to conference with a personal data account courtesy of AT&T, Verizon or one of the other telecommunications providers.

In my case, I had data accounts on my iPhone and on my iPad, but my thumbs just weren’t up to the task of rapid data entry. I had been planning to be super efficient by using the excellent keyboard that is part of my laptop. Unfortunately, my laptop could not reliably connect to the WiFi. For someone who spends most of her time at conferences tweeting up a storm, this day has been challenging. That said, there were several people who had more productive thumbs and were able to tweet a fair amount today. You can find their tweets under the hashtag #ILTA13. I hope to be among them tomorrow.

 

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