Enterprise 2.0 and Social Networking’s Influences on Human Resources [#e2conf]

Oliver Marks moderated this session involving representatives from Newsgator, Neudesic, Yammer and Ultimate Software.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2012 in Boston. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Using Social Tools to Augment HR Data.Lisa Sterling, Head of People Engagement at Ultimate Software, reports that her HR group gathers HR-related information from their Yammer implementation to provide timely performance data. For example, rather than treating performance reviews as an annual event, they find status updates in Yammer in which colleagues praise the work of other colleagues and use that current information on individual performance.
  • The Alternative to the Document-Centric Approach of HR. Newsgator uses a social layer to surface HR-related information in the place where people are working — not in a separate HR system of record. A Neudesic customer is using an auto-follow function in Neudesic Pulse during the onboarding process to provide new employees with a group of early connections to help their integration into the organization.
  • What’s the Impact of Individual Social Activities on Our Work Life? When Ultimate rolled out Yammer, they didn’t provide warnings about forbidden activities. Rather, they helped employees understand the benefits of microblogging. They haven’t had an issue with self-promotion or improper reciprocity (e.g., if you praise me, I’ll praise you). Ann Lee reiterates that before you implement a social tool, be sure you’re clear about the business benefits. Don’t focus merely on the “coolness” of the tools (or the dangers of the tools).
  • What’s the Value of Adding Social? Neudesic estimates that organizations will save initially $1500 per employee from implementing their product. However, if a social tool fosters a connection that leads to a business process improvement or a product innovation, then you’re looking at a much bigger return on your social investment.
  • How to Filter Information in these Systems? Information overload can be a major problem with social platforms. Yammer enables you to structure the data dynamically to help surface relevant information, aggregated by topics that are pushed to users.
  • Should HR be Involved in Social Media Implementation? HR needs to be sure that the social platforms are supported by appropriate staffing outside IT (eg., from knowledge management, etc.). These new tools will surface new roles such as content curation and community management. HR is a key stakeholder that is commonly overlooked in these projects that typically are viewed as primarily technology projects. HR’s role shouldn’t be limited to sanctioning employees for using Facebook at work. HR should be involved in deployments to leverage its extensive knowledge of the organization’s culture and work force.
  • Success Stories Newsgator reports that Deloitte views their social tools as a key part of their overall talent management effort. They look at “the whole arc” of the relationship between an individual and their organization and see how social tools foster that relationship. Ultimate Software realized that with the influx of millennials, Facebook (and similar sites) had rich collections of data on Ultimate because their millennials were posting there. Ultimate wanted to give those millennials an internal place to post that valuable information. When Neudesic integrated their own product (Neudesic Pulse) with their HR system, they found that by strategic use by HR, they were able to make the onboarding process quicker and more effective. One of Yammer’s retail clients uses Yammer to share best practices and market information in real time across the organization.
  • Collaboration is a People Problem, Not Just a Technology Problem. If a company views HR solely as a cost center, that organization is unlikely to give HR a seat at the table. If a company views collaboration as a performance challenge, then you have to involve the talent management team.
  • The Consumarization of HR Just like we’ve experienced the consumarization of IT, employees are asserting more individual approaches to their training and career development. They want to learn in a manner that suits their personal style and they want to take that learning with them. Social technology can help tailor HR offerings to the need of the individual.
  • Social Flattens the Organization By its very nature, social technology tends to sidestep hierarchy, thereby flattening the organization. It also surfaces talent. HR needs to be aware of this and needs to be able to shape this and deal with the consequences. HR could also exploit this for leadership development and successsion planning purposes.
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Keynote: Bryan Barringer (FedEx) [#e2conf]

Bryan Barringer is manager of enterprise collaboration implementation at FedEx Services. He is focusing his talk on gamification, but he says it’s really about unlocking knowledge by changing mental models.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2012 in Boston. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Why Gamify?You need engagement, which comes from adoption, which comes from viral growth. How to get viral growth? You need to provide incentives. Gamification helps unlock knowledge. When that knowledge is shared, the more relevant the resource is to users. Gamification also allows you to gather key analytics. For example, they have the statistics to prove that they have been able to reduce email usage by 20%.
  • You must know your CultureUse an approach and language that fits neatly with your organization’s culture. Be careful about focusing on the play aspects if your corporate culture is not open to it. In addition, be aware of the average age of your organization’s workforce. That will provide clues as to the right approach. Another great way to investigate culture is to send out carefully crafted surveys. They can help reveal the prevalent mental models.
  • The FedEx Program They use a badge program to unlock knowledge. For example, you must blog five times in order to get a badge. Other badges are awarded for following others and for being followed (this is how connections are made). Badges also highlight professional training and certificates, as well as special awards and recognition and compliance activities.
  • Some Pitfalls(1) Don’t create barriers to using the tool. Therefore, don’t make a certain number of badges mandatory before a person can have access to key functionality. These sorts of barriers to entry create unnecessary frustration and disengagement. (2) Don’t assume you actually understand your user base — survey widely. (3) Involve Legal and HR early. (4) Use the badge program as a carrot, not a stick. Don’t award a “Scarlet A” for bad behavior.
  • There are lots of Gamification ResourcesFor example, check out gamification.org. Or follow Bryan on twitter.
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Keynote: Philip Easter [#e2conf]

Philip Easter is the director of mobile apps at American Airlines.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2012 in Boston. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • The Sky is Not the LimitMobile access and customer service should not end when you step on a plane. He showed a demo film of customer service at 30,000. He claims that soon their mobile app will provide this level of service (he was able to connect with an agent who can chat with you over free wifi) in the air.
  • Their Guiding Principles(1) User Interface is the critical – that’s how you serve the customer. (2) Think INTENT not location. Focus on what the customer wants to do, not just where the customer is.
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Keynote: Staying Connected at Nike [#e2conf]

Richard Foo is collaboration director at Nike.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2012 in Boston. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • FasterIt’s not about being fast, it’s about being faster. They use Cisco Quad (Cisco WebEx Social) to help them people connect internally even faster than before. They also want to connect people to information faster. Ultimately, they want to innovate faster.
  • Evolve Immediately(This is another Nike buzz phrase.) They don’t like to sit on the sidelines. They try to improve their product and processes constantly.
  • Change Management Focus They had supportive executives, which was a good thing. However, while that was necessary, it was not sufficient. Ultimately, they needed to reach and serve all the folks on the frontlines of the organizations. Therefore, their social strategy included a focus on change management to ensure a successful transition to social.
  • Involve Key Stakeholders EarlyDon’t wait to involve the key stakeholders who can send your project off-track: legal, HR and Communications. All of them have a legitimate interest in what you are doing and can be a tremendous help if included in your planning early.
  • Their Strategy(1) Focus on mobile before the desktop; (2) Use existing resources as much as possible; (3) Accelerate the pace of gaining new connections because those new weak ties can be hugely helpful; (4) Integrate neatly with established tools — you can’t ignore the reliance of your workforce on email and SharePoint; (4) Take a business first perspective rather than a traditional IT perspective — this opens the way to more adventuresome approaches;
  • Help people see the value of working in a new way Create a compelling vision that emphasizes improvements in individual performance (and the personal value — what’s in it for me?), as well as business performace and value. Keep the message simple, but be sure you address individual challenges and objectives.
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Keynote: Nathan Bricklin [#e2conf]

Nathan Bricklin is the SVP of Social Strategy at Wells Fargo. His talk will focus on lessons learned at Wells Fargo as they have evolved their internal social strategy.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2012 in Boston. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Conference tweets from last year’s conference point to important lessons: (1) Social behind the firewall is different that external social since the folks behind the firewall are focused on process (this was taken from Ross Mayfield’s keynote last year.). Therefore, internal social tools needs to be integrated well with process. (2) Andy McAfee reminds us that you don’t win the game in the first winning. Therefore, don’t lose heart too early; just keep moving things forward. (3) John Stepper stated that social tools are good for many things, but not necessarily everytthing. Therefore, fit your tools to the situation carefully. (4) Rachel Happe’s tweet focused on the importance of ongoing community management to ensure your social efforts progress.
  • Wells Fargo’s Culture is Key“We think together and therefore love being team members.” Over his 20+ years with Wells Fargo, he has always found it to be a very collaborative place.
  • Interdependence is a Good Thing No business executive executes a strategy that is independent from the overall organization’s strategy. Similarly, don’t pursue a social strategy that is independent from the business strategy of your company.
  • Key Attributes of their Social Tools(1) Start at the point of frustration. That’s when people are willing to devote the time and energy necessary is solve the problem. (2) When you focus on the point of want, people ask for all the bells and whistles. When you focus on the point of need, people ask for something simple that just gets the job done.
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McAfee: Business Leadership Roundtable [#e2conf]

Andy McAfee hosts this discussion with Paul Greenberg (The 56 Group), Marcia Conner (Altimeter) and Ted Schadler (Forrester).

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2011 in Boston.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • What’s New?. The term “social” is going away. Collaboration is fading as a buzz phrase too. Meanwhile, senior HR leaders in large corporations are thinking about using social software to get things done in their organizations. So, HR is about to become a big focus for social software. Some of this is because there has been a gap in companies in terms of who or what improves productivity. This allows HR to help free the potential of 90% of their employees rather than devoting all their time on the 10% of employees who present compliance or risk challenges. Another important innovation is that companies are deploying command centers that track customer feedback. Radian6 is one of the companies that makes is possible.
  • When will things actually change? Within three years Marcia Conner believes that most employees will be taking action for themselves to obtain the social software they need to get their work done. This should force organizations to start deploying these tools on an enterprise wide basis. Ted Schadler says that 50% of employees now say that their technology at home is better than what they have at work. Two-thirds of Gen Y employees say their personal technology is better. Similarly, 35% of employees say they purchase their own work devices. Employees are moving ahead of their employers when it comes to technology. Meanwhile, as long as senior management remains entrenched and unaware of these shifts, the organizations will not formally change. Paul Greenberg says, however, that the communications revolution is leading some companies to allow some experiments under the radar. The manager may not completely understand social software, but they are willing to let their people try.
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How Do You Measure That?

Rawn Shah (Business Transformation Consultant, IBM) and Hardik Dave (Senior Business Analyst, IBM) talk about how to create a strategy to collect the metrics that are best for your social business implementation.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2011 in Boston.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Why do you need metrics?Metrics help demonstrate value — particularly value to customers. Metrics also can help demonstrate operational excellence. Finally, metrics can shed light on what makes the people and culture of your organization special.
  • Who will use the Metrics?The intended users and uses help identify the necessary data points that you should be collecting. For example, Marketing and HR have very different business goals and may need completely metrics. That said, they both may want similar metrics regarding how their content is consumed.
  • What Types of Metrics Do You Need? Metrics reflect qualitative, quantitive, attitudinal, or behavioral characteristics. All are related to demographics. The business value comes from providing the right metric to the right person. The metrics chosen often depend on the role of the recipient. For example, one person may be interested in content consumption rates, another interested in brand management or sentiment. Both may be tracking activity, but for different reasons.
  • How do you collect metrics?Collection methods depend on the type of metric. For example, activity or traffic data may be collected passively by your social software. By contrast, attitudinal data would be collected by surveys, anecdotes, day-in-the-life studies, interviews and focus groups. However, the type of survey you use to assess group vitality (attitudinal) will be quite different from the survey used to assess interactions.
  • When do you collect Metrics?The timing is a function of the maturity of your social business. Start with basic satisfaction, social activity and content activity data. As the program matures, add social graph and group vitality data. Further along, you can measure brand reputation and individual reputation.
  • Surveys.As long as you ask the right questions, surveys can help identify gaps. Later, you can use surveys get feedback from early adopters to obtain guidance on technical issues. For example, the IT department at IBM has a workplace effectiveness survey with respect to social business. They asked which social activities were most important to employees and how satisfied they were with the available tools. The resulting data helped the IT department understand which social business tools were most important and which needed to be improved first.
  • Interviews and Focus Groups.Interviews and focus groups are an effective way to collect anecdotes. As you are doing this, always be on the lookout for success stories, as well as early warning signs of potential problems.
  • Day in the Life Visioning.This a great tool for understanding business process in real life. By random sampling across people in similar jobs, you can reveal patterns that are firm wide.
  • Activity Logging.How and how often are people using the social tool? How are they interacting with the content, with each other?
  • Content and Sentiment Analysis.This data helps provide aggregate understanding of brand, reputation and the content. What are people talking about?
  • It’s not the size (of the data) that matters. It’s what you do with it.
  • Making a Social Analytics Strategy Map. Start by understanding what business issue you need to address and then consider what data will help illuminate the problem and solution. Once you have the data, you can starting making some interesting connections. For example, how does group vitality affect content sharing? What is the impact of sentiment on collaboration levels? Make sure you understand properly the direct impacts, the correlations. At IBM, they have done a study of high performing sales people and the extent to which they are also high performing collaborators. A study like this requires data across multiple years. (Rawn released this data on SlideShare in 2008.)
  • What’s the Dollar Impact?Don’t always assume that the data will lead directly to a dollar impact. However, it should help the business leaders understand their business better and make better decisions.
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Lavoy & Knowlton Keynote: Purpose or Perish [#e2conf]

Debra Lavoy (Director, Product Marketing, Digital and Social Media, OpenText) and Tyler Knowlton (Chief Strategist on Digital Innovation for the Chief Trade Commissioner, Dept of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Government of Canada) discuss how critical meaning is for engagement. They go so far as to say we either need to find purpose or perish.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2011 in Boston.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Why Purpose MattersWith a strong sense of purpose, people work harder and better. Without it, they lack engagement and often end up in confusion. Only a strong sense of shared purpose can overcome personal politics. In fact, OpenText has found that the single best predictor of success in a deployment is the strength of purpose of the team involved.
  • OpenText PrizeOpenText is offering a prize to the organization that can demonstrate how important a shared purposes has been their success. The prize is a $10,000 contribution of a charity of the winner’s choice.
  • Learning from the G20 Experience.The G20 is a summit of the leaders of the biggest economies to discuss the state of the global economy. The summit has a rotating chairmanship, however, there was no shared knowledge base. Therefore, each summit host country effectively has to start from scratch. As a practical matter, this means that knowledge is shared via email. When Canada became chair and host, Knowlton’s team first focused on “digital diplomacy,” but then were asked to find a better way to create a knowledge base. It started because the Canadian delegate was “sick of email.” He asked Knowlton’s team to come up with a solution that could be Canada’s legacy gift to the G20 organization. This led them to a cloud-based online solution that allowed G20 participants to communicate and collaborate. (They partnered with OpenText on this.) As they moved to this more ambitious purpose, the team became more adventurous, more confident, more decisive adn more creative. The project was so successful that the Knowlton’s team has been retained to advise each of the countries that has succeeded Canada as chair and host.
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Bert Sandie Keynote: The Biggest Challenge is Culture [#e2conf]

Bertie Sandie (Electronic Arts) says that the biggest challenge for Enterprise 2.0 is creating and maintaining a culture of collaboration. He asks is we have a roadmap for creating a culture of collaboration.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2011 in Boston.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • What can be done to foster collaboration?Give them virtual and physcial places to share and then acknowledge their contribution. (Electronic Arts copies the contributor’s supervisor on the acknowledgement in order to provide positive reinforcement.) You also need to create an environment that stimulates collaboration. EA actually has physical spaces that encourage people to gather and share ideas (complete with comfortable seats and whiteboards). They remove barriers and move people in order to ensure lots of cross-fertilization.
  • Organizaton Affects Collaboration. How are your people organized? In pods, teams, divisions, business units? Is each level of the organization optimized for collaboration? Each level will have a different culture of collaboration and one culture may not transfer easily to another part of the organization. Nonetheless, it is possible to improve culture in real-time by well-designed team building exercises.
  • Change Management is Hard.Sandie cautions us that most change management and culture change efforts fail. There are a variety of models (see John Kotter), but you will need to develop a model that works well in your environment. At EA they focus on Heads, Hearts and Hands. This means changing how people think, feel and act. Sandie works in corporate learning and leads workshops to help lead change.
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Ross Mayfield Keynote: Evolution Not Revolution [#e2conf]

Ross Mayfield (Socialtext and SlideShare) talks about how social software is more about evolution than revolution.

[These are my notes from the Enterprise 2.0 Conference 2011 in Boston.  Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error.  Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • In the FlowMayfield credits Michael Idinopolous for reminding us that knowledge sharing happens best “in the flow” rather than “above the flow” of work. Ideally, knowledge sharing is a by-product of getting things done. Our job is to provide the social tools that facilitate this sharing. Socialtext has seen 95% levels of adoption/participation when they have put social tools directly in the flow.
  • Goal-Oriented Social Software.This is where this industry should be headed. Online fundraising shows us how effective social tools can be to spread the message and create good. What would happen if we had goal-oriented uses of social software within the enterprise?
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