#ILTACON from the Bridal Suite

2016_ILTACON_logoPeople attend the International Legal Technology Association’s annual conference (ILTACON) for a variety of reasons. Whether you are looking for outstanding educational sessions, insightful conversations with your peers or informative encounters with leading technology vendors, ILTACON has it all.

In prior years, my strategy has been to attend as many educational sessions as possible so that I can drink from the amazing firehose of useful information provided at ILTACON. (I have then tweeted or blogged those sessions so the rest of you can benefit from those sessions as well.)

This year, however, I found that instead of sitting in the scheduled educational sessions, I was sitting in the Bridal Suite.

To set the record straight, I was not in the Bridal Suite for any reasons having to do with a wedding. Rather, the Bridal Suite was ILTACON TV’s studio and I was fortunate enough to be one of the interviewers. This meant that I had the privilege of participating in wide-ranging conversations with some of ILTA’s impressive thought leaders.

If time permits, I’ll be revisiting those interviews and blogging some of their key content. In the meantime, here are links to the interviews I conducted that are now available. (I’ll update this post as more interviews become available.) Plus, there is a bonus link so you can learn from the conversation between Todd Corham (CIO, Saul Ewing) and Jeffrey Brandt (CIO, Jackson Kelly).

John Alber (ILTA’s Futurist, formerly Strategic Innovation Partner at Bryan Cave):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – John Alber from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

Katie DeBord (Strategic Innovation Partner, Bryan Cave) & Jay Hull (Strategic Innovation Partner, Davis Wright Tremaine):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Katie DeBord and Jay Hull from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

Michelle Mahoney, Executive Director, Innovation, King & Wood Mallesons):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Michelle Mahoney from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

Chris Emerson (Chief Practice Economics Officer, Bryan Cave):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Chris Emerson from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

Keith Lipman (President and Co-Founder, Prosperoware):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Keith Lipman from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

David Michel (Director of Technology Services, Broad and Cassel):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – David Michel from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

Lida Pinkham (Technology Training Manager, Ice Miller):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Lida Pinkham from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

BONUS: An interview between Todd Corham (CIO, Saul Ewing) and Jeffrey Brandt (CIO, Jackson Kelly):

ILTACON 2016 – ILTACON TV – Jeffrey Brandt from ILTA on Vimeo.

 

 

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Implementing Business Practices That Foster Shared Interests — #ILTACON #ILTA103

ILTACON 2015 LogoSession Summary: Many organizations are adopting “best business practices,” but they would be most effective if they intersect, bringing together the shared interests of law departments and law firms. Where do you begin? Let’s start the conversation with a panel of representatives from law departments and law firms who will discuss how to come to agreement on best business practices.

Speakers:

  • Lisa Damon, Seyfarth Shaw
  • Katie Debord, Bryan Cave
  • Mike Haven, NetApp
  • Peter Krakaur, Solar City
  • John Alber, retired strategic innovation partner, Bryan Cave (moderator)

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2015 Conference. Since I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • The Rise of Legal Operations. Mike Haven explained the legal operations function within law departments, especially departments with 50 or more in-house lawyers. In the 1990s companies like GE, Bank of America, Prudential, Cisco, HP and other Silicon Valley companies inaugurated this role.  Initially, the role focused primarily on cost savings. In the early 2000s, the role evolved beyond cost management to technology implementation. Since the global financial crisis of 2008, legal operations professionals have been charged with the task of reducing legal spend. Now legal operations professionals are responsible for a variety of functions including cost management, alternative support models, data analysis, vendor management, communications, strategic planning, litigation support, data governance, records management, knowledge management, etc.
  • First Audience Exercise. You are a partner at a law firm and have a client who recently moved to a new company, Acme Corp, to become its general counsel. Your client has discovered that Acme’s systems cannot provide a general understanding of the company’s overall expenditure on legal matters. As part of a broader RFP for transactional and litigation work, your client has told you that it intends to implement an eBilling system and has asked you for an opinion about eBilling platforms. Additionally, Acme more broadly has asked for help in identifying ways to track engagements, manage conflict waiver requests, monitor fees, streaming accruals and billing, and track overall legal spend.
    • What is the challenge for Legal Ops?
      • Define for itself the management problem it is trying to solve (e.g., matter and financial management) and what it needs internally and from external counsel to enable the law department to meet it’s own goals.
        • what shared expectations?
        • what individual and share business processes?
      • Then think about what tools (e.g., eBilling platform) would be most helpful and must external counsel must provide the necessary data?
      • Throughout this process, keep in mind the company’s own tolerance for risk and ambiguity.
      • Haven:
        • the first thing you need to do is put a team in place to manage the process. You may need to engage a consultant to help drive the effort.
        • Get a handle on the range of technology.
        • Understand what your budgetary constraints are for the project.
        • Find out what your external counsel typically use. This may save money spent on the learning curve.
        • Should you involve procurement in the RFP process?
        • Get IT involved early — especially if you are looking at cloud solutions.
        • What geographies are ou looking at? It is more complicated to deploy eBilling platforms in Europe because of taxes.
        • Have a project manager to drive the implementation
        • Prepare eBilling guidelines and then train your external counsel regarding those guidelines (e.g., when to submit forecasts, bills, etc.)
          • CLOC has prepared some sample eBilling guidelines. You can find this via ILTA in the downloads connected with this session.
        • Put a team in place to monitor the tool, support use of the tool, push data to dashboards, etc.
    • What is the challenge for the law firm? The main challenge for the firm is provide help that is valuable to its client.
      • Review the firm’s historical matter billing records and share those with the client.
      • The firm can analyze its historical billing records.
      • The firm can research eBilling platforms internally (with finance, even though they may be fundamentally hostile to the various eBilling platforms) and externally (either with other clients who might be able to provide direct advice to Acme, or with consultants).
      • The firm can provide an eBilling solution as part of the entire engagement.
      • The firm should consider its own ability to support the business process improvement necessary internally for the firm to help the client’s aspirations regarding cost management.
      • Ask: what’s the clients essential problem and what assets do I have to help the client?
      • Caveat: Haven noted that it would surprise in-house counsel if many law firms have been asked this question since most law departments handle this on their own. That said, Debord reported that Bryan Cave often gets this request — especially when there is a new general counsel.
      • Haven: “I love the idea of collaborating on matter data.” Getting [external counsel] involved upfront on the types of eBilling features that would be helpful for both parties to manage a matter would be great.
      • Damon: If these conversations happen, it is usually between the client’s finance function and the law firm’s finance department. The partners don’t usually see anything except information on receivables.
  • Second Audience Exercise: “The Axe”.  You are in the legal department of Acme Corporation. The new general counsel has received a clear mandate from the board to cut expenses dramatically. The GC has set a goal of reducing overall spend by 30% over a two-year period. The GC is looking for at least a 10% reduction in 2016 and has asked you to present a high-level plan for the reductions by October 1, 2015.
    • What should the legal operations function do?
      • Assemble a team and then create a process map for the cost reduction effort.
      • Gather ideas: What are the low-hanging fruit? What work can you eliminate?
      • Then get historical data on legal spend to test your ideas/theories AND expose additional options
        • what do the types of legal work cost?
        • what do the various external firms charge?
        • what’s the relative efficiency of the firms?
      • Gather ideas: What types of work can you eliminate?
      • Consider reducing the size your panel of external counsel
      • Solicit cost reduction ideas from external counsel
      • Implement cost reductions.
      • Monitor ongoing work and costs to measure efficiency and quality. Have the lower costs led to lower quality?
  • Mike Haven.
    • The key is to spread a mindset that the world has changed. Clients are being pressed by their organizations to improve their service while cutting costs. The client’s objective is NOT to put the law firm out of business. However, the client has a deep interest  is working with efficient firms. The more the law firm understands the client’s needs, the more the firm can help.
  • Katie Debord.
    • There is a huge investigation stage to many matters. However, before jumping into this, take a step back and make sure you understand exactly what the client needs and how the client defines success.
  • Peter Krakaur.
    • Know your client. Understand the client’s business model. Have conversations with the clients. Don’t just get lost in the data. The client rarely has the luxury of time, so the firm needs to move quickly to support client decision making.
    • Invest more in process mappers and data analysts than in business development people. This change will ultimately bring the firm more business.
    • The client actually is looking for business advice, not just legal advice.
  • Lisa Damon.
    • Collaboration between a law firm and its client is critical. Eliminating 10% of cost is easy — firms do this all the time. The tougher challenge is to create a sustainable way of working together over the long term.
    • Start by listening carefully to the client.
  • John Alber.
    • Law firms need to change their attitude. Their “expert” attitude (e.g., we know all the answers) is highly toxic. Instead, firms need approach these challenges from an attitude of openness and collaboration.
    • Law departments are lean in resources, and they believe that law firms are relatively rich in resources. Yet the clients do not see firms bringing those resources to the relationship. Firms need to take a fresh look at their own assets and think in new ways about deploying them to improve the client’s situation.
    • Some law firms are training their associates to reforming attitudes and approaches. But 95% of firms are not.
  • Key Takeaway: Law firms cannot provide the ultimate value to clients until firms change their approach and then reorganize their processes and staffing to support the client the way the client wants to be supported.
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