Next-Level KM — Produce One Billion in Benefits by 2020 #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

The KM journey in Shell is heading for a new turn. Manders discusses how KM developed and evolved over the past 15 years and zooms in on recent experiences with implementing a complete set of KM tools, processes and Working Out Loud behaviors. He talks about how KM in Shell realized $300 million value in the last couple of years, how they aim to triple the impact by 2020, and what other qualitative and quantitative impact they have made in Shell’s communities. Learnings, as well as structures and practices shared, as well as the next step in their journey: moving KM under the Organizational Development function in HR, describing the logic behind this decision, objectives, and expectations. Manders discusses future developments envisioned to further improve the KM capability in Shell. To learn more about Shell’s techniques plan to take workshop 16 on developing scenarios!

Speaker:

Willem Manders, Global Head of Knowledge Management, Projects & Technology, Shell

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Shell’s KM journey.
    • In 2013, they tried to scale up their impact by standardizing their approach.
    • Wave #1
      • Dsicipline engineeing
      • Wells
      • Development
      • Capital Projects
    • Wave #2
      • Process Engineering
      • Maritime
      • Exploration
      • Upstream Commercial
    • Wave #3 (they are about to finish this wave)
      • Research & development
      • Projection
      • Safement and  Environment
      • Contracting and Procurement
    • They focused on making KM more useful and relevant in the business
  • How Shell’s KM team delivered more than $350 million of value.
    • Knowledge Management strongly supports the Shell Strategy
      • KM too often focuses on its “cool tools” while the C-Suite focuses on specific strategic chalenges. Now KM focuses on theosestrategic challenges
      • Identify key value areas (based on the work of Etienne Wenger)
        • if you want to sustain the long journey that is KM, you have to show value
        • Short-term value vs long-term value
        • Organization value vs. individual value
        • 2×2
          • short-term value for individuals
            • Performance Support
              • improved productivity
              • increased engagement
          • short-term value for organization
            • Operational Excellence
              • Define it and replicate it
              • improved decision-making
              • create an arean for problem solving and collaboration
              • enable continuous improvement
          • long-term value for individuals
            • Learning & Development
              • enhanced onboarding and role changes
              • shorten the time to autonomy
              • 70% is learning on the job, 20% is learning from others, 10% is formal training
          • long-term value for organization
            • Winning Capabilities
              • conribution to winnign and differntiabing capabilities
              • learning what it takes to be successful
      • Purpose Areas
        • connect people to poeple
          • track leading indicators
          • collect success stories that demonstrate value
          • share those stories widely
        • connect people to content
        • support collaboration
        • capture and reuse lessons learned
      • Then provide KM elements
  • Performance Support.
    • This is “powered by KM”
    • They use “Working Out Loud” to enable people to help each other
    • They connect people in communities in practice to enable sharing of problems and solutions
    • They identify time saved and translate this to money saved.
  • Learning & Development.
    • They focus on “Learning Nuggets” — the smaller the piece of learning, the easier to find it and the easier it is to find.
    • They have their internal version Khan Academiy
  • Performance Excellence.
    • Their focus is on “Replicate don’t reinvent.”
    • Their executive VP for Retail championed the process; he held an awards ceremony for the most successful replications in their retail operations.
    • The cultural change: the engineers in their organizations are often focused on creating new solutions altogether. Now they are being asked to be creative in their replication efforts.
    • Replication allows you to calculate fairly easlly the value of not having to reinvent.
  • Winning Capabilities
    • In addition to after action reviews, use “before action reviews.” This brings organizationational knowledge to the forefront and allows it to shape the way they do business. It helps them do better every time..
    • This is their version of working out loud.
  • Support the Energy Transition.
    • Shell’s KM team is working with their new energy team to accelerate the transition to renewables.
  • How to move from a programmatic KM approach to an embedded KM approach.
    • Some options:
      • in operational groups
      • in IT
      • in Marketing & Communication
      • in Finance
      • in Learning & Development
    • Where KM housed has a huge iimpact on how KM is done.
    • Housing Shell’s KM in its HR function (organizational learning & development), allows them to focus on individual and organizational improvement.
      • Previously, KM, learning, and development were in separate silos. Therefore, they saw potential solutions through their own lenses not through shared lenses.
    • To optimize business reults, they must focus on People, Processes, Structure,  Culture AND Leadership
  • Look for Hooks. Manders looks for hooks in the business that allow KM to accelerate change journeys for the business.
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Wilkinson Keynote: Entrepreneurial Skills for Knowledge Sharing #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

Sharing knowledge for enterprise success requires entrepreneurial skills, new ways of thinking and operating, continuous learning, and change. There are many new tools available to help, but it is the people and the culture of an organization that determines its ultimate success. Wilkinson interviewed 200 of today’s top entrepreneurs, including the founders of Airbnb, LinkedIn, eBay, PayPal, Yelp, Dropbox, Tesla Motors, SpaceX, Chipotle, Under Armour, Spanx, Jetblue, and Revolution Foods, to distill what it takes to go from startup to scale in our rapidly changing economy. As leaders reinvent their approaches to digital transformation for organization survival in this economy, they can learn these fundamental skills, practice them, and pass them on. Join our accomplished researcher and speaker as she shares her framework and provides ways to master the skills that underlie entrepreneurial success.

Speaker: Amy Wilkinson, Founder & CEO, Ingenuity and Lecturer at Stanford Graduate School of Business; Author, The Creator’s Code: Six Essential Skills of Extraordinary Entrepreneurs

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Find the Gaps.
    • Be curious:
      • children ask 100 questions per day; adults ask 2-3 questions per day. This is due, in part,  to our development of expertise, which leads us to create our own silos. This, in turn, becomes our Achilles heel that stops us from becoming innovators and entrepreneurs.
    • Be an architect:
      • Look for the open space: find a green field on which to build.
        • Elon Musk — see a problem and then go back to first principles to solve it. He saw that space shuttles were like airplanes that were thrown away after every flight. He thought this made no sense. So he started SpaceX to figure out how to make cheaper, reusable shuttle.
      • Solve a problem for yourself and then scale the solution for others.
        • Sara Blakely — she solved the pantyhose/underwear problem for herself. Because she was the first woman to tackle this problem, she had a real challenge convincing the men in the industry. So she did it herself: she taught herself how to file a patent application, her mother (an artist) drew the schematic. Blakely kept going until she found a manufacturer with daughters who was willing to listen. She persisted.
    • Be an integrator:
      • Look for opportunities for innovation at the intersection of disciplines, industries, markets.
      • Chipotle: the founder was a classically trained chef. He wanted to create fast meals from fresh food. So he mashed together his classical culinary training with the fast food process. This created a restaurant at which a chef would be willing to eat.
  • Drive for Daylight. In this fast-moving world, act as if you are in a race car. You have to focus on the horizon, not on what is right in front of us. Typically, most businesses focus on what is right around them or, worse still, they focus on the rearview mirror.
    • Avoid Nostalga: you can’t be nostalgic about the past  — especially if you’ve had tremendous success. Netflix had big success with DVD by mail but overcome customer protests to move from that to streaming.
    • Fire yourself: Andy Grove at Intel used to talk about the importance of “firing yourself.” They asked themselves (when they thought they might be fired becuase of the poor performance of their business), what would our successor do? The answer was to get out of the old business and then move into the microprocessor business. This led to extraordinary growth.
    • Be prepared to cannibalize your own products — Apple does this time after time.
    • Focus on “to go” rather than “to date.” This keep your focus forward — on the problem you need to solve, on the product you need to ship. This allows you to meet your near-term goals.
  • Fly the OODA Loop. Observe, Orient, Decide, Act.
    • Eventhough the Russians had better fighter planes, the American air force has maintained
    • Paypal: they merged two businesses and then went through 6 different business models in 18 months.
    • Paypal Mafia: then after they sold PayPal to eBay, they all tried new ventures and have been successful.
      • Jeremy Stoppelman: The first thing you try likely will not work. So look for a “counterintuitive blip of data” that could point to a new, more profitable path.
      • Always have a wingman: this is someone who will question your assumptions and help improve your thinking
    • Startups view business as a form of intellectual debate. This enable fast action. In a large organization, people aim for consensus. However, this can be too slow in a fast-moving world.
  • Fail Wisely. This goes beyond failing fast. Have a failure ratio (e.g., 1/10 things I try won’t work or 1/3 things I try won’t work.) The key is NOT to aim for zero. This means that you are aiming for perfection, which will shut down your innovation and risk-taking.
    • Place small bets:  don’t put all your money on one bet. Place small bets on several opportunities.
      • Stella & Dot: their ratio is 1/3. She counts on her team to make fast decisions on new products: “love it or lose it”
    • Titanic Example: You know you have a catastrophic problem (e.g., you’ve hit an iceberg). You know how many people you have and you know how many lifeboats you’ve got. What do you do?
      • Reframe the problem: switch from saving the ship to saving lives. Then you use the lifeboats as ferries to move people from the ship to the iceberg where they can stay until rescue boats arrive.
      • Repurpose what you’ve got: Look for alternatives that can function like life boats (e.g., anything that floats will work — tables, doors, etc.)
  • Network Minds. We need to focus on cognitive diversity, not just visible diversity. The goal is to harness different points of view and then build on that.
    • IDEO Approach: use space
    • Amazon’s two-pie rule: they want folks to work in teams — but small teams that can be fed by two pizzas. Then they get to know each other and can get things done.
  • Gift Small Goods. Provide small kindnesses to others. Do five-minute favors. This helps amplify your reputation because of connectivity. Then information, opportunities come to you.
    • Generosity enhances productivity — Bob Langer at MIT is always trying to amplify the work of his students in their drive to ending human suffering. The are regrowing human tissue (including vocal chords for Julie Andrews and Larry Page). They produced the nicotine patch. They have developed many innovative delivery mechanisms for cancer treatment.
    • Focus on the “snuggle for existence.” This will help enormously with the struggle for existence.
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Stop Failing At Failing

With the rise of digital startups, we have become used to hearing about the need to fail fast and fail often. And we have told each other repeatedly that failure is important, failure is necessary, failure is good.

So why do we resist failure?

Because we are not stupid!

The reality is that despite all the cheap talk about the usefulness of failure, few of us find ourselves in organizations that actually put their money where their mouth is. For example, how often does your boss commend you for failing? Or, does your organization’s performance management system regularly reward you for failure?

No? I thought not.

In the absence of a supportive boss and performance management system, why risk your career by failing? Wouldn’t the wiser course be to play it safe, even if it means that you rarely experiment or innovate? After all, curiosity killed the cat!

While being risk-averse may seem like the safer path in the short term, it is a death sentence for your organization over the longer term. Without experimentation, innovation, and a healthy dose of curiosity, everything stagnates — people, processes, and organizations. And, instead of moving ahead or even just keeping up, they simply fall behind.

As Ellen Glasglow wisely observed:

The only difference between a rut and a grave are the dimensions.

So if we want to avoid the deadly rut, what should we do? Stop failing at failing and learn to do it better.

There are reliable techniques that help us understand how to fail in smarter ways and how to use those failures to make ourselves and our organizations better. We have learned the value of safe-to-fail experiments, failure targets, and failure parties. But that is only the beginning. At KMWorld 2018, I’ll be leading a workshop entitled From Failure to Fantastic that explores more techniques we can use to get the indisputable benefits of failure without unduly suffering its negative consequences. These techniques are borrowed from a variety of professions and industries, including medicine and oil and gas.

I hope you will join me at the workshop so that we can help each other stop failing at failing.

[Photo Credit: Makunin]

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Industry Leaders Conversation: Change, Culture, and Learning #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

Former head of KM with the BBC, Semple believes in conversations and leads our panel on a far-ranging discussion of change, culture and learning as we all aspire to an outbreak of common sense on our journey for knowledge sharing and creating sustainable, high-functioning organizations and communities.

Speakers:

  • Euan Semple, Director, Euan Semple Ltd
  • Jean-Claude Monney, Former Chief Knowledge Officer, Microsoft, Columbia University and Digital Transformation Coach
  • Kim Glover, Global Manager of Knowledge Management, TechnipFMC
  • Nancy Dixon, Principal Researcher, Common Knowledge Associates

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Why knowledge management?
    • at Microsoft Services, Jean-Claude Monney was given responsibility to get 100% of Microsoft knowledge to 100% of Microsoft’s customers, 100% of the time.
    • Best of the knowledge = relevant (in the context of the work) and trustworthy
    • For Nancy Dixon, knowledge management helps the organization learn better and faster.
  • What is the pedigree of knowledge?
    • if the knowledge comes from a person, is that person reliable/trustworthy?
    • if the knowledge comes from a document, is the source of the document reliable?
  • Knowledge management should focus on the issues that matter.
    • Nancy Dixon worries that KM focuses too much on the tactical (how to be more efficient) but misses the issues that can really bring down the organization, such as ethical issues.
    • General Motors once had a terrific KM group. However, they were unable to help the company prevent bankruptcy. What if there were a KM group at Volkswagon that could shed light on ethical issues? Would that have prevented the emissions control disaster? Would there have been a different outcome at Wells Fargo if there were a KM-organized forum for employees to express their concerns about business practices that did not align with the company’s mission statement?
  • Conversation is Consequential. 
    • Conversation is something you enter with the realization that you might be changed.
    • Conversation in an organization creates a culture — it is important to notice what is talked about AND what is not talked about.
    • An organization that wants the benefit of consequential conversation must first create an environment of psychological safety.
  • We Make Culture.
    • Culture is not just something that is something that is done to us. We make culture by everything we do (or do not do).
    • We learn culture in the first instance from our experiences with our direct managers.
  • How to Start a KM Program.
    • If you are lucky, the CEO comes in one day and says we need a KM program.
    • More likely, find business problems that KM can help solve.
    • When you are asked to “show them the money,” don’t assume the responsibility for the numbers. Instead, partner with the business first, find out what KPIs are important to them, and then figure out the value KM adds to achieve those KPIs.
    • Before you mention KM to anyone, collect stories of instances when one unit helped another unit (and how much money was solved). Then suggest to management that you create an organizational strategy out of this collaboration.
  • What’s Next for KM?
    • Monney:
      • We are experiencing a massive change due to digital augmented knowledge. The reality of AI and augmented reality is extraordinary. The key is to use AI to improve a human’s ability to make better decisions.
      • We need to figure out to digitally transform our business — or someone else will.
      • We need to develop empathy
      • We need to harness the source of knowledge — but what if the knowledge is the heads of contractors or people who do not want to be handcuffed to the organization.
    • Glover: As technology gets better and easier to use, KM professionals can go back to being “people people” rather than reluctant technologists.
    • Dixon: There is an erosion of cognitive authority. We have stopped trusting CEOs and other people in positions of authority. KM’s role is to make things more transparent so that we can operate without omniscient authority figures.
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Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast — or Does it?

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast,” famously attributed to the late business guru Peter Drucker, perfectly states the need for an organization’s culture to be aligned with its strategic objectives for there to be any hope of fully realizing them. Culture is tribal and pervasive. And, it can vary depending on the group, environment, or objectives. But, this powerful and often unconscious set of forces that influences both individual and collective behavior can be harnessed to drive culture change and reinforce shared values within an organization or project team. Speakers explore examples of “epic culture fails” resulting from strategy that neglected the cultural component, then impart seven tips to drive outcomes that leverage culture to support organizational- or project-based strategy. These tactics can be used to support a company or project team’s core values and culture while creating synergies with strategic initiatives and shortening the time to adoption. Aligning the strategy of whatever it is you are trying to do with the culture of whoever it is you are working with is paramount. It can mean the difference between success and failure. Culture doesn’t have to eat strategy for breakfast; they can be harnessed together to create organizational strength and a better overall customer outcome.

Speakers:

  • Kim Glover, Global Manager of Knowledge Management, TechnipFMC
  • Tamara Viles, Manager of Knowledge Architecture, TechnipFMC

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

Session Slides: 

Viles & Glover – C202_Viles.pptx
Glover & Viles – C202_Glover(1).pptx

NOTES:

  • Value Moment.
    • A Value Moment =
    • Today’s Value Moment: Knowledge Mangement needs to be just in time, just for me, and just what I need.
  • Culture.
    • Culture is critical if you want to execute your strategy.
    • Culture = how we do things around here
    • It is an unconscious set of forces that influence individual and group actions
    • Ed Schein is the considered the father of culture. He wrote Organizational Culture and Leadership, and the Corporate Culture Survival Guide.
      • What is Culture?
        • Structures and Process: the visible layer of culture, the observable artifacts
        • Espoused Values: the stated mission, how the organization talks about itself internally and externally.
        • Real Culture: the basic assumptions of an organization — what the group has learned over time from its successes and failures. These assumptions, ideas, even pictures need to be challenged and replaced if you want to change the culture. These are the unwritten rules.
    • Examples of strong organizational culture
      • Starbucks
        • Structures & Process: their observable artifacts (the way they look, they way they work) are strong and consistent
        • Espoused Values: they buy fair trade coffee, they recycle, they hire veterans
    • Culture reinforces itself by promoting people who live by the organization’s unwritten assumptions and beliefs.
  • Epic Culture Fails.
    • Wells Fargo is currently suffering an enormous gap between the organization’s stated mission and their culture.
    • AT&T/AOL Time Warner merger — early reports indicate that the two companies have radically different cultures. And they have fairly negative assumptions/beliefs about each other.
    • Hollywood is suffering a huge gap between stated values and actual culture/behaviors.
  • Components of Great Culture.
    • Clear Vision and Strategy: Volvo has an unambiguous commitment to safety that they have built on over decades.
    • Shared Values: Your actions must align with your words. (Walking the talk.)
    • Common Practices: Your processes must align with your strategy and values.
    • Engaged People: According to Monster.com, departments with healthy culture have 30% less turnover in staff.
    • Common Narratives: Positive stories that celebrate and strengthen an organization’s unique culture.
    • Reinforcing Physical Environment: Physical surroundings that align with and support the culture.
  • Tips and Tricks for Healthy Culture.
    • Seize every opportunity to reinforce your culture.
    • Assess your culture before creating your strategy. Will they be mutually supportive?
    • What you reward is what you will get.
    • Collect and share stories that support your culture.
    • Identify your champions and evangelists
    • Keep people engaged by making work fun.
    • Build on the familiar by integrating new things with existing practices.
    • Make the invisible visible: provide help and support — connect the dots so people can find what they need and share what they know.
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Making a Digital Workplace Work #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

For 11 years, the global Intranet and Digital Workplace Awards have uncovered and shared remarkable solutions. This year is no exception! See the best of this year’s winners from the U.S., Europe, and beyond. They range from small ideas to entire platforms, giving something for everyone to take away. Ismail discusses the challenges of developing a rigorous and robust, efficient and effective digital workplace environment in a multi-cultural, decentralized organization and what means and methods can be used to create a viable digital workplace. A variety of different tools are recognized, such as the intranet, internal and external collaboration platforms, and enterprise search.

Speakers:

  • James Robertson, Founder, Step Two
  • Carlos Pelayo, Director, Lead IT Business Partner for Communications and Public Affairs, Shire
  • David M. Feldman, Associate Director Collaboration, Shire
  • Brian Duke, Senior Manager, Intranet Solutions, Thermo Fisher Scientific

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Fisher Scientific.  [Here is a link to their slides, including screenshots]
    • Following the example of consumer apps, they put their Yammer feed front and center on their intranet page. They did not shove it over on the side or hide it behind a link.
    • They are using Microsoft Flow to automatically post content to designated feeds.
    • They use tyGraph to collect and display their Yammer usage metrics
    • Of the 38K activated Yammer accounts, 31K were active on the intranet in the last month.
  • Shire. Governance First Intranet [Here is a link to their slides, including screenshots]
    • They found it really helpful to start with governance, rather than touching on it at the end of the intranet project
    • This project came out of an acquisition — Shire acquired a much larger organization. They grew from 7K to 23K employees.
    • They started by looking at the problems in the various legacy systems.
    • They wanted to reuse as much of the content as possible from the legacy systems.
    • As much as possible, they want to configure rather than customize
    • They gave people the freedom to do what they wanted — but within predetermined guardrails.
    • They used Microsoft Office 365
    • They created a consistent look and feel across all devices by using custom-branded webparts.
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Employee Experience — the Heart of the Digital Workplace #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

The idea of the “customer experience” is a powerful one, and it’s a strategic consideration for most big organizations. As a result, we’ve seen a huge degree of customer-centric digital transformation. Within the enterprise, the concept of the “employee experience” is equally powerful. Going beyond basic usability and UX, it takes a holistic view of how solutions are designed and delivered. This practical session outlines how digital workplace professionals and projects can use the employee experience as a strategic driver for change. Real-world examples of great employee experiences from around the globe are shared.

Speaker: James Robertson (Founder, Step Two)

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • James Robertson Slides
  • Horrifying Employee Engagement Statistics.
    • In the US, only 32% of employees say they are engaged
    • In the rest of the world, only 13% of employees say they are engaged
  • A digital workplace”. “A digital workplace consists of the set of tools you already have.” The problem is that it isn’t good. What’s a great digital workplace?
    • a holistic set of tools, platforms, and environments that enable work
  • Visa’s Digital Workplace.
    • delivers high functionality and a rich user experience
    • they provide a great mobile experience — they go beyond responsive design to provide a dedicated mobile app.
  • Coles Supermarket Chain in Australia.
    • Their intranet = “My Coles”
    • They wanted to provide high functionality for (previously underserved) employees in the field that is comparable to the functionality previously available only to office-based employees.
    • They provided a mobile app that could be used on personal devices on an opt-in basis. They have high rates of adoption.
  • Swisscom.
    • They provide 3 home pages
      • one is all about news — all the time
      • one is all about tasks — all the time
        • it is tailored to the individual user and their function
        • it includes the one piece of content EVERYONE wants: the cafeteria menu
      • one is “about us”
    • Through this approach, they demonstrate that they are interested in providing the materials that the employees care about most to do their jobs.
  • Telstra.
    • Their goal was to make their intranet so effective that they would be able to reduce the number of support calls
    • Their employees cannot be paid without submitting their time sheets. So they provide a visual display on the HR page of their intranet which shows the individual employee’s current level of time submission
  • What about allowing staff the ability to personalize their intranet pages?  In theory, this is a wonderful approach because it treats employees as engaged adults. However, research shows that only 5-10% of staff ever take advantage of the option and actually customize their pages.
  • A truly delightful employee experience is also effective for the business. The Mando Agency is a professional services firm that cannot bill its clients unless its own staff submits their time sheets. To manage this challenge, Mando installed an internet-operated beer fridge that was programmed to unlock on Fridays, but ONLY once everyone in the firm had submitted their time tickets. The firm provided a dashboard showing everyone how close they were to achieving an unlocked fridge AND which people were blocking progress by their delinquency in submitting their time. This gamification and extreme transparency work. In the five years since they installed the fridge, the employees have failed to open it only once.
  • How to provide a good Employee experience?.
    • Learn about how the employee works and what they need.
    • Have a deliberate digital approach that allows you to do all of the following three things simultaneously, but at different paces:
      • Projects: make sure you have at least one project for every budgetary period in order to make continuous improvements to the digital workplace
      • Strategy: this should enable the “big leap” that takes 3-5 years –it shows the trajectory of the combined effect of these projects
      • Vision: these big ideas about the future
    • Take ownership of your employee experience
      • don’t give this away to vendors, don’t let the vendors dictate what your employee experience should be
      • your needs are different from those of your vendors so if you are going to meet the unique needs of your employees you need to exert some control over the vendor offerings.
    • Establish Governance
      • Step Two provides an Intranet Operating Model
      • Governance is merely a means to an end
    • Take every (small) opportunity to improve your digital workplace and employee experience
      • but beware that every change has an inherent cost — it is disruptive, it asks for different processes or behaviors, etc.
      • Step Two provides a 6×2 methodology to help choose which changes are feasible and worth doing.
  • Dream Big, but iterate often!
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Transforming Portals into Digital Workspaces #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

Rebuilding aging portals is a daunting task. Years of accumulated knowledge and information are stored in portals that have become too big and too convoluted to function efficiently. The potential value of the information stored there is clear, but cleaning portals up and transforming them into a modern, flexible, and scalable digital workspace is no small feat. Our speakers discuss devising and executing a program to transform a dinosaur of a portal into an active hub of multilateral information exchange, describing how they did it and what they learned along the way. This includes the structured and patterned approach to redesign and rebuild the old portal in a systematic and predictable way; the role of internal social networks as tools for both communication and collaboration; the role of information items and contextual search as building blocks of information repositories; introducing the concepts of portal transformation to content owners who were initially resistant and functionally fixed; and selling the large information management project to C-level executives. Merck (known as MSD outside of the U.S. and Canada) is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop, and provide innovative products and services that save and improve lives around the world. Hear how it implemented a KM strategy for self-service that considered user experience-driven technology, as well as a change execution management methodology that included process, people, and content. Get tips and success factors on the case for change and the holistic solution for an IT self-service portal that included people, process, content, and technology components.

Speakers: 

  • Craig St. Clair, Principal Consultant, Enterprise Knowledge LLC
  • Cindy Larson, Director, Digital Channels and Platforms, Adient
  • Karen Romano, Associate Director, Knowledge Management, Merck
  • Charles Denecke, Director, Global Operations Management, Merck

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

 

SESSION SLIDES:

Romano & Denecke – B101_Romano.docx
Romano & Denecke – B101_Romano.pptx
St._Clair & Larson – B101_St_Clair.pdf
St._Clair & Larson – B101_St_Clair(1).pdf

 

NOTES:

Adient

  • Cindy Larson:  They started with an old-fashioned portal site that they had rebranded after a mergers & acquisitions event(without changing the underlying functionality). So they were ripe for an upgrade. Their executives wanted something different, something new, something that users would truly miss if it went down.
  • Major Workstreams:
    • Productivity
    • Engagement
    • Collaboration
  • Constraints. They had to work incrementally. And they could not take the portal offline while doing the upgrade. It had to be fully functional during the transition.
  • Employee Communications. They expanded their Yammer use. In addition to existing peer-to-peer use, they now started using it for top-down corporate communications. To help identify corporate communications, they created a corporate “avatar” for the internal communications stream.
  • Content handling. They separated the all-company facing content from team content. Then they adjusted search scopes to ensure that the users got to the intended target quickly.
  • New Info Infrastructure
    • enterprise metadata and content types
    • common search facets
    • a patterned approach for interface and repository design
  • Prioritization Plan. They focused on content and processes in the following order
    • End-user value and importance
    • Relative size and complexity
    • Readiness of individual content owners
  • Repeatable Process. They created a process for tackling the huge amount of legacy content they had
    • Engage with content owners
    • Guide content owners through a cleanup of their legacy content
    • Extend the enterprise metadata and content types — but just as much as necessary
    • Extend the standard information  and document repositories
    • Migrate refreshed content
    • Build out contextual landing and search result pages
    • Launch and announce the newly transformed functional area
  • Marketing
    • they use internal social media announcements (via yammer and blog posts)
    • they talk up the changes in town halls and other meetings
  • To learn more about the Adient Portal effort: See the white paper that Cindy Larson and Craig St. Clair wrote

Merck: Self-Service for IT Support

  • Massive Support Requirements. The Global Support Center has close to 200,000 interactions with internal and external customers each month.
  • How they create content. They record support calls, capture the knowledge, and then use that knowledge to fill holes in their knowledge base.
  • Plan for change.
    • Stakeholder analysis
      • what behaviors do they need to learn?
      • what behaviors do they need to stop?
      • what behaviors do they need to continue?
    • Sponsorship requests — they were explicit about their asks. This clarified things for their sponsors and increased success.
    • Incent behaviors
    • Promote benefits
    • Measure effectiveness
      • They compared the results for Tier 0 (online self-service), Tier 1 (Helpdesk), and Tier 2 (specialized help)
      • They were looking for an increase in Tier 1 and a corresponding decline in Tier 1 requests
      • They use net promoter score to assess customer satisfaction
  • Marketing Plan
    • Digital
    • Signage
    • Onsite events
    • Having business leaders speak about the new service portal. “People don’t love the HelpDesk but they love the portal.”
  • Lessons Learned and What’s Next.
    • Before you start:
      • be prepared to demonstrate the business value of the proposed KM activities
      • strong sponsorship is a key enabler of change.
    • Plan for change — change is the hardest part of the process, not the new technology
    • Do extensive end-user interviews and testing. Then listen to them carefully to discern user requirements.
    • Forget about perfection. Use an agile approach: improve and iterate.
    • What’s next: keep track of progress and share results with sponsors (to maintain their commitment) and with users (to maintain their engagement).
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John Seely Brown Keynote: Knowledge Sharing in our Exponential World #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description: People & Tech — the Future of Knowledge Sharing

People are at the core of knowledge-sharing—the key to high functioning organizations. In John Seely Brown’s words, “We participate, therefore we are.” New and emerging technology can only enhance learning, sharing, and decision making to create successful organizations. Join our inspiring and knowledgeable speaker as he shares his view of the future of people and tech working together to share knowledge and create winning organizations.

Speaker: John Seely Brown, Director, Palo Alto Research Center

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • We live in an Exponential World.  We are experiencing an exponential curve along which roughly every 18 months we have something new we have to think about. And that new thing forces us to change our view of our current best practices.
  • Whitewater Rafting. Whitewater rafting is a good metaphor for this age. In this period of rapid shifts (every 18 months), we are constantly creating tacit knowledge but do not have enough time to distill that knowledge and make it explicit. This means that we have to acquire new skills rapidly. However, the half-life of our skills is about five years. So we can never rest.
  • Scalable Learning. In this age of exponential change, we don’t merely need scalable learning. We need scalable UNLEARNING. This is the ability to forget our old tacit knowledge (and the associated beliefs) in order to replace it with newer, more correct knowledge and skills. The challenge is that we are caught in our own Competency Trap: sticking with what we know/do best — even in the face of obvious and unavoidable change.
  • Unlearning is hard. Unlearning depends on being able to find and expunge our own tacit knowledge and beliefs. The challenge is that sometimes we are completely unaware of those beliefs — we don’t realize we have them.
  • Start by Getting out of your Comfort Zone. Jack Hidary has a helpful protocol: every year, he takes a few days to learn something completely outside his area of expertise: (1) Attend a conference and sit and listen to every session. (2) On day 2, do not attend any conference session. Instead, sit by the coffee pots and listen to how subject matter experts talk about the subject. They will be “shamanistic,” using lots of jargon. Notice what they take for granted, notice what they miss. (As an outsider and novice, you will see things they do not see.) (3) On day 3, go outside and think about what you have heard and observed. Then determine what is actionable and worth pursuing. Using this approach, he attended an energy conference, did a quick deep dive into this area of expertise, realized we needed to switch to hybrids. He took action by convincing New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to convert some of its taxi fleet to hybrids. And he convinced President Obama to launch the Cash for Clunkers program.
  • Orchestrating Serendipity:
    • Choose serendipity environments
    • Develop Serendipity practices
    • Enhance Serendipity preparedness
  • Reverse Mentorship. Ths is a very practical and effective way to learn new skills
  • Institutional Innovations. How do we help our organizations think differently — not just use new tools?
    • Hackamonth — This is silo busting at Facebook. It’s a hackathon that lasts for 30 days to crack a problem. They do solve a lot of problems but, more importantly, they are building deeper communities of practice across the whole company.
    • Skadden Arps — they have implemented bi-directional learning opportunities by pairing young associates with senior partners. This work is facilitated: Peter Lesser (Skadden’s CEO) is the convener/moderator/translator.
  • New tools for empowering the edge.
    • cloud computing enables the edge to access all the power it needs without core approval
    • cloud enables nearly infinite scalability and reach, and enables new business models
    • social media amplifies engagement with external partners, customers and others in the core
    • bog data allows you to interpret weak signals
    • blockchain enables smart contracts with no overhead
  • Listening Tools. We also need tools that help us listen to each other better, interact with each other better.
  • Reality Mining. Sandy Pentland studies how to build great teams. He has learned that “patterns of communication are the most important predictor of a team’s success.” Just by listening to the intonation of the communications, the amount of information actually shared, the amount over-talk, Pentland’s group could separate the high-performing teams from the low-performing team.
  • Amplifying DevOps. DevOps creates a great deal of “digital dust.” Can we collect all these communications (across email, Slack, Jira, etc.) and mine them to improve our understanding? How would this then change the way we work?
  • What we Need for the Big Shift. The Big Shift calls for more than just scalable learning and unlearning. It calls for a new ontology  = a new way of being. This means blending in ourselves Homo Sapiens (man who thinks), Homo Faber (man who thinks) and Homo Ludens (man who plays). This playing isn’t just about recreation. It’s about “playing with” ideas and challenges in order to reach a breakthrough moment, an epiphany. Therefore, we need to learn how to do this type of play:
    • probing and pushing the boundaries
    • how to invent within a space of rules
    • deep tinkering
    • how we interrogate context is a form of “play” — like a detective who makes sense of the clues she reads in her environment.
  • Imagination is the Key. It is the way that we play, it is the way that we fuse or find an internal blend of knowing, making, and playing.
  • Our Symbiotic Relationship. When Big Blue defeated Gary Kasparov some thought it was the end of the ascendancy of humans. However, it also signaled an opportunity. Zack Stephens nd Steven Cramton were winners of the Freestyle Chess Tournament, which effectively is “a race with the machine” that is “a generative dance between us and the machine.” We need to look for opportunities for more generative dances.
  • What about IA? IA is Intelligent Augmentation. We can use intelligent augmentation to provide imagination (as the binding agent) with new properties.
    • Homo Faber + IA = digital assistants
    • Homo Ludens + IA = freestyle chess, Go masters
  • Networked Imagination: We need to create in each of us a product blend of human & machine. Then we need to figure out how to create distributed communities of practice that function as networked imagination.
  • CAUTION: “The real difficulty in changing any enterprise lies not in developing new ideas, but in escaping from the old ones. (John Maynard Keynes)
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Be Agile Not Fragile #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description: To be agile in knowledge management, and to innovate, Garfield suggests the following principles: identify three key business objectives, focus more on helping people use processes effectively, improve decisions, actions, and learning, connect people to each other so they can help each other at the time of need, implement, improve, and iterate. To avoid being fragile, steer clear of these traps: maturity models, best practices, metrics for the sake of metrics, certification, tool rollout and adoption, personality tests, corporate speak and more! Sure to spark an interesting discussion so don’t miss this session.

Speaker: Stan Garfield, Knowledge Manager, Author Implementing a Successful KM Programme; Founder, SIKM Leaders Community

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2016 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Fragile things typically are:
    • Large
    • Overly optimized — they are too smart for their own good; they are obsessed with standardization and efficiency
      • this works if everything goes according to plan
      • BUT things rarely go exactly according to plan — Randomness is the Rule (not the exception) — in the face of random errors or problems, the fragile system cannot cope with the variability
    • Brittle — they don’t have the innate ability to fend off stress
  • Fragilistas:  these are people who try to eliminate volatility.
    • Helicopter parents try to make life as safe as possible for their children but in the process they deprive their children of the ability to learn how to cope with variability and randomness.
  • How to avoid becoming a Fragilista? Avoid these behaviors
    • Maturity models and benchmarking: it’s good to learn from others but don’t try to conform to a rigid model.
      • Seth Godin: “Benchmarking against the universe actually encourages us to be mediocre, to be average, to just do what everyone else is doing.”
    • Best Practices suggest that the ideal has been achieved. Rather it’s better to look for (and then adapt for your context) “proven practices” that fit your environment.
    • Metrics for the sake of metrics — avoid tracking every random thing. Make sure there is a business reason for tracking something.
    • Certification — taking a one-week class in KM is not enough to be a KM expert. Focus on learning not on certification.
    • Tool Rollout and Adoption — don’t fixate on rolling out tools and then “driving” adoption. The better approach is to start with understanding the needs of the organization rather than finding a use for the tool you have purchased.
    • Personality Tests — each person is unique, not an oversimplified archetype. Why do we need this categorization? What is the practical use?
    • Corporate Speak — don’t use buzzwords, insider jargon, or corporate lingo. Refuse to use them —  use words and expressions that are widely understood if your intent is to communicate clearly.
    • Do as I say, not as I do — you must practice what you preach.  Your senior management must lead by example. (And the KM team must lead by example too.) People will closely observe the actions of leaders and mimic them. Therefore, model the desired behaviors.
    • Secrecy — don’t give lip service to transparency while continuing to operate in a closed manner. Communicate frequently, truthfully, and openly.
    • Mediocracy — man organizations have leaders have little (if any) talent and skill who nevertheless are dominant and highly influential. Leaders should serve their people and  treat them with respect.
  • Unfragile behaviors
    • people can’t find information
    • People are reluctant to ask for help in public
    • organizations want to push information out
  • How to Move from fragile to agile?
    • Make content easy to find
      • let users tag content to indicate “I reused this document” or “I found this document helpful”
      • figure out what documents are most important to your organization and force those to the top of the search results
    • Assist people when they ask for help
      • make it easy to figure out where to ask a question
      • train people to ask questions in community spaces
    • Use the power of pull
      • don’t force content on others
      • make your content/tool so attractive that people are eager to opt in
  • What would a “self-healing” KM system look like? (Question from Christian de Nef)
    • Simplicity
    • Mobility — easy to switch from one platform to another
    • Knowledge systems that do not rely on technology
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