Beyond the Hype: Putting AI to Work at Liberty Mutual #ILTASS18 #ILTACON

Session Description: Neota Logic and Liberty Mutual will share details of the design and implementation of Neota Logic’s AI-driven expert system platform to automate document creation and drive internal efficiencies at Liberty Mutual.

Speakers:

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • It’s just software.  According to Kreutzer, “It’s only AI when you don’t know how it works; once it works, it’s just software.”
  • Why did Liberty Mutual even consider using AI?
    • As a life long geek, Jeff thought that AI was a cool thing to explore. The purpose of this exploration was to try to reduce some of the cognitive load, some of the lower-value tasks that slow the legal department’s lawyers down. Ultimately, it was intended to allow the lawyers to focus on higher-value tasks.
  • Forget the pixie dust. With all the hype about AI, it is easy to be dazzled by the “pixie dust” aspects of the technology. However, in Marple’s view, 90% of the work in an AI deployment project involves capturing, organizing and cleaning the relevant data. Without this essential work, you cannot get to the pixie dust.
  • Start with small, low-risk projects. To prove the value of the technology, they started with their internal non-disclosure agreement (NDA) process. (As with many companies, the NDA process was more onerous and time-intensive than the corporate legal department — and their internal clients — would like.)
  • Their timeline to deployment. The bulk of the time was spent exploring the technology options and identifying the right use case for their pilot. The actual process of creating and deploying their instance of Neota Logic took two to three weeks.
  • Their new toolbox. They are creating a toolbox that includes Neota Logic to be deployed throughout the organization. Because Neota is a business-facing tool, the business folks can use Neota to improve processes without involving a single developer.
  • What skills and competencies best support AI deployments?
    • Legal Engineers are perfectly placed to support AI deployments. They can be lawyers or business analysts. However, they need an understanding of the law and they must be willing to “lean in to technology.” Plus, they must have a healthy curiosity about the technology.
    • Some law schools are training their students in legal technology by using Neota Logic in their courses. Faster than we know it, most law schools will be training students in legal technology. And, when they enter law firms, they will simply practice law in a tech-enabled way.
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Iron Tech Lawyers: Unleashing Technology to Improve the Practice of Law

For years optimists have said that things will get better once Millennials become associates in law firms. According to these optimists, this younger cohort will bring new values and new ways of working to hide-bound firms. At this point in time, several classes of digital natives are now beavering away in law firms around the country, but we haven’t seen a huge wave of change. In fairness, they are still very junior and probably do not have the requisite power within their firms to insist on improvements. Further, in harsh economic times one could be forgiven for putting one’s head down and working hard rather than rocking the boat. Finally, and most importantly, their law school education was fairly traditional so they were not trained to buck the traditional ways of doing things within their firms.

Does this mean that nothing will change? Not necessarily so. At least one law school is training its students to think differently about the practice of law.

On April 17, Georgetown Law School will be hosting its second annual Iron Tech Lawyer Competition. It is the capstone of the practicum taught by Professor Tanina Rostain and Adjunct Professor Roger Skalbeck called “Technology, Innovation and Legal Practice Practicum – Access to Justice.” The focus of this seminar is to ground law students in the possibilities and practicalities of  law practice innovation enabled by technology. Here’s how the curriculum guide describes it:

This practicum course exposes students to the varied uses of computer technologies in the practice of law. During our seminar meetings, students become familiar with various innovative software platforms that are being adopted in law practice to enhance access to justice, capture legal expertise, interface with clients, manage litigation and transactional processes, and increase the efficiency and quality of legal services. Topics include: legal expert systems, virtual law practice, automated document assembly, technology assisted document review, and electronic legal research. For the field placement component, students work in small teams for a legal service organization to develop a platform, application, or automated system that increases access to justice and/or improves the effectiveness of legal representation. These organizations include civil rights organizations, direct service providers, and government agencies. The course culminates in a design competition, The Georgetown Iron Tech Lawyer Contest, which is judged by outside experts in the field. Along the way, students learn teamwork, an understanding of the relationship among the rules and doctrines that apply within a particular legal regime, and visual literacy skills. The goal is that, by the end of the semester, each team will have built a functional app that is adopted by the legal service organization and put into use for the organization or its clients.

This course is not about using Microsoft Office efficiently. It’s about unleashing the power of technology to unleash the power of the law.

Wow.

I, for one, cannot wait to see what happens when these Georgetown Law School graduates begin to practice law. They have been taught how to use technology to practice smarter for the greater good. More law schools need courses like these. And every law firm needs graduates like these.

[Hat tip to Neota Logic for providing the expert system that was so critical for the Iron Tech Lawyer program.]

Update from Professor Rostain on April 16: “If you want to catch a glimpse of the action, go to http://apps.law.georgetown.edu/webcasts/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=2007 or click through our home page. The link will go live shortly before 1:30 {Wednesday] afternoon.”

 

 

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