E2.0 Adoption Roundtable

Members of The 2.0 Adoption Council will discuss a host of issues from culture shock to data privacy.  This session will draw questions from the audience to drive relevant topics that may not have been addressed in previous conference sessions.

ModeratorSusan Scrupski, Executive Director at The 2.0 Adoption Council, Dachis Group
Panelist – Bart Schutte, Director, Web & Architecture, Saint Gobain
PanelistJamie Pappas, E2.0 & Social Media Strategist, Evangelist, and Community Manager, EMC Corporation
PanelistLee Bryant, Director, Headshift
PanelistDennis Howlett, Industry Blogger
PanelistMary Maida, Information Solutions Manager, Medtronic, Inc.

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

  • What was missing from the Enterprise 2.0 2010 Conference?
  • We need to have more conversation about the business value of E2.0 success stories, not just metrics about activity levels.
    • Lee Bryant: in a specific project that involved lots of groups/communities, the leadership team asked each group/community at the begin to define what success in this project would look like.  This led to both quantitative and qualitative measures, but identified in a way that is sensitive to each case.  If you don’t spend the time to identify success factors at the begin, you end up having a tougher time establishing the tough business case.
    • Bart Schutte: It can be difficult to identify metrics at the beginning that are relevant at the end. You may have to start with anecdotes.  In addition, with a new project you may have to focus on total cost of ownership rather overall ROI. If the TCO is low, then implementing the project is considered low risk.
    • Mary Maida: While focus on numbers is good, don’t underestimate the ability of executives to understand the softer factors – ability to work together more easily and effectively.
    • Lee Bryant: you need to calibrate your request carefully – some managers tend to focus entirely on the numbers. If you need to pitch to them, you’ll need to find some useful numbers that they can understand.  However, many business leaders absolutely understand the value of transformation and don’t take a bean-counter’s approach.
    • Claire Flanagan:  Executives in global companies can understand impact on strategy rather than just the impact on the bottom line.
    • Dennis Howlett: We are stuck with the current accounting system – you ignore it at your own peril.  Therefore, the more you can find useful numbers that make sense in the existing accounting system, the easier it will be to advocate for your E2.0 program and prove success.
    • Chris Slemp (Microsoft): we have gestures for liking, but do we need a gesture for indicating that something found via social media provoked an insight, a breakthrough moment.
    • Claire Flanagan:   You can get real value from going back to connect the dots between the success stories and the specific events that occurred via social media that led to the breakthrough moment.  Don’t miss this opportunity!
  • Cultural differences across countries and regions:
    • Bart Schutte: in a global company, a certain amount of homogeneity is inevitable.  As people rise through the company tend to adapt to the dominant national culture.
    • Jamie Pappas:  Members unilaterally decided to communicate in their native language.  Some others use the E2.0 tool to practice their English.  It would be great to have local champions who can encourage these types of behaviors.
    • Dennis Howlett: This is a horribly sensitive, complicated topic.  Be prepared to be offended (and possibly offend) when you tackle this issue.
    • Lee Bryant: There is no “national majority” in HeadShift. Rather than focusing on national stereotypes, consider whether you have a “corporate culture” that supercedes the national culture of any sub-group within the org.  Make sure that you make the tools sufficiently malleable so that people in different places can use the tools productively in different (but appropriate) ways.  If you can do this, you won’t need to get hung up on national and cultural analysis.

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Great 2.0 Adoption Council Workshop

Today marks the official start of the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston.  However, several folks lucky enough to arrive early were able to attend a full day workshop sponsored by The 2.0 Adoption Council’s Practitioners’ Workshop.  Susan Scrupski (@ITInsider) and her colleagues organized a full day in which early adopters of E2.0 tools gave presentations and led discussions on the challenges and opportunities they had experienced being in the vanguard of E2.0 adoption.

As you will know from my earlier post, Where’s the E2.0 Beef, I’ve been concerned about the perception that E2.0 is all hype and little adoption.  One of my reasons for attending the E2.0 Conference was to test this perception and to learn from others the most successful path to widespread adoption within an organization. Yesterday’s sessions provided a good start to that effort.

For those of you who were unable to attend, here are links to my earlier posts on the workshop.  In the interests of full disclosure, I should tell you that they are straight notes (lightly edited) rather than reflective pieces.  I’m hoping to return to this material later and write more, once I’ve had a chance to think about it further.  In the meantime, I’ll continue to live blog and tweet the conference so we all can work with these excellent materials.

Thanks to The 2.0 Adoption Council for a great day!

********************

My Workshop Notes:

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Mitigating Real or Perceived Risks

Here are my notes from the fifth session of the Enterprise 2.0 Black Belt Workshop:  Mitigating Real or Perceived Risks

Speakers:

  • Kevin Jones, Social Media & Network Strategist/Manager, NASA/MSFC
  • Bart Schutte, Director, Web & Architecture, Saint-Gobain

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

The Proactive approach to dealing with Nay-sayers.

  • What are the common objections?
    • What if someone enters the wrong information?
    • Compliance risks
    • Why would I want to use these tools if I’m already very productive?
    • If I share, I’ll lose my competitive edge
    • I don’t have time for this!
    • This will cause an eDiscovery headache
    • I need to be careful about what I say
    • We don’t want negative comments
    • Why can’t the search act like Google?
    • What I say will be used against me
    • I don’t want to look stupid
    • If I post something, my boss will think I’m not working
  • What are the perspectives of Executives?
    • They expect E2.0 to help increase innovation
    • They expect E2.0 to improve process and work products
    • They are afraid that workers will “waste time”
    • They are suspicious of employees who are “social” [as opposed to serious]
    • Worried about legal compliance concerns
  • What are the perspectives of  HR?
    • This will attract and retain talent
    • This will help us shape (reshape) organizational culture
    • Worry about employee efficiency
    • Worry about liability
  • What are the perspectives of  Middle Managers
    • They like the possibility of improving their ability to operate globally
    • Helps get junior staff into a network
    • They worry about loss of control (information ownership is control)
    • They worry about losing the automatic credibility/authority that comes from their position
  • What are the perspectives of the Employee?
    • This is a great way to increase my visibility
    • This will give me greater access to information, experts and resources
    • What I say and do will be used against me
    • I’ll be pressured to participate and will be judged badly if I don’t
    • I worry that others will say/post things about me that I don’t like?
    • What if my confidential information is disclosed?

Real Issues vs Perceived Issues:

  • Real Issues
    • Employee Rights issues
    • Personal data protection issues
    • Company liabiltiy for
      • Employee Rights issues
      • Personal Data Protection issues
    • Control challenge for managers
    • Confidentiality concerns
    • Workers’ Counsil issues (primarily in Europe)
  • Perceived Issues (i.e., issues that we are already dealing with)
    • There is no clear ROI/Business justification
    • E2.0 is a waste of time
    • Inappropriate content
    • Accuracy of information
    • Participant’s age or ability
    • Unsupportive culture
    • Controlling the content
    • Information overload
    • Employees will abuse system and waste time
  • This is all about PEOPLE
    • Most perceived isses are emotional – regardless of the subject
    • While all of the issues seem real, not one is new
    • But the speed of E2.0 makes the issues seem more pressing
  • Solutions can he found to all of these issues
  • Address these issues direstly with key stakeholders
    • Involve HR and Legal early in the process.  Get their perspectives and include them in the job of solving the problems with you.
    • Ask them to help you set appropriate policy
  • Create and Champion policy decisions that support an “Open” approach
  • Focus heavily on educating employees so that they use the tools intelligently, productively and safely
    • This may include doing one-on-one training if that helps the reluctant or nervous to get started
    • Give people a “sandbox” to try the new tools and behaviors
  • Use the community of users to self-monitor and self-regulate, but be willing to report of issues that are not effectively handled by the community
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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Measuring E2.0 Success & Business Value – Metrics & Analysis

Here are my notes from the third session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop:  Measuring Success and Business Value – Metrics and Analysis

Speakers:

  • Ted Hopton, Wiki Community Manager, United Business Media
  • Donna Cuomo, Chief Information Architect, the MITRE Corporation

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

Ted Hopton:

  • His company organized the Enterprise 2.0 conference
  • They use Jive software for their enterprise 2.0 platform
  • Focus first on participation
    • Use the analytics module of your enterprise 2.0 tool to see who is visiting the site, where the activity is taking place, who is creating and viewing content, etc.
    • Analyze active members by level of activity
  • Problem: Make sure the metrics tie back to your project goals
  • Use qualitative measures to improve your understanding
    • Use a survey – ask how and how often people use the community
    • List possible positive outcomes and ask users which of these outcomes they have experienced
    • Ask why they don’t use the tool more
      • Use blunt, negative statements
      • Encourage them to tell you exactly how they feel
    • Use this information to benchmark (and draw out the venom – otherwise it festers)
    • Net Promoter Score – give users a scale of 1-10 and ask them how likely they are to promote your work.  Scores above 6 indicate that they will promote rather than detract your promoter. Subtract your scores below 6  from your scores of 6 and above. This yields your “Net Promoter Score.”  Obviously, the higher the better.
    • Track your success stories and share them
  • Lessons Learned
    • While it’s good to have consistent metrics, be aware that metrics evolve and your methods should evolve too
    • Beware of benchmarks (e.g., the 90-9-1 standard of participation). Make sure the benchmark you are using really applies to E2.0 projects.

Donna Cuomo:

  • The Mitre Company runs four differently federally funded programs (including for the Dept. of Homeland Security and the Dept. of Defense)
  • Use Case 1:  Improve MITRE’s Research Program Selection Process
    • They used Spiggot to be their “innovation management tool”
    • They wanted to codify their research competition process
    • They wanted to stop people further down the food chain from weeding out ideas too early
    • They wanted to encourage broader participation (from a review perspective)
    • They created an “Idea Market”based on a SharePoint wiki
    • Their first-year metrics indicated broad participation
    • They were able to create widespread transparency
    • They used surveys to compare the new tools (and user satisfaction) against the old tools/methodologies
  • Use Case 2: Social Bookmarking
    • Hypothesized that social bookmarking would inmprove resource sharing, leveraging the research of others across teams and the corporation
    • They also thought the tagging would help identify experts within the organization
    • They used a tool similar to Delicious
    • Bookmarks helped create a lightweight newsletter (this was an unexpected benefit)
    • You don’t need many participants in order to provide real value to the entire organization
  • Use Case 3: Babson SNA Study
    • They identified super users of their internal social networks and social media (brokers) and then interviewed their colleagues
    • They discovered that these super users tended to be innovative and provide huge value to their networks
    • Frequency of interactions was not as important as the number of unique connections each broker had (indicative of their ability to have an impact on a wider range of people).

Exercise:

  • What are the most important things you are NOW measuring?
    • Number of communities
    • Number of community members
    • Percentage of contributors versus consumers
    • Usage across geographies, business units, etc.
    • Number of visits
    • Dwell time (how long is each visit)
    • Number of concurrent users at any one time
    • Number of people editing (indicates collaboration)
    • Number (and identity of ) lurkers
    • Measuring conversion of lurkers to active participants
    • Participation in community activities (who is sharing, who is editing, who is tagging, etc.)
    • Utilization of the various social tools
    • Success stories
  • What are the most important things you should be measuring?
    • Abandonment rate – when do visits/activity drop off
    • Tracking against business goals
    • Net Promoter Score
    • Day/time of highest activity
    • first and last page viewed
    • business improvement metrics
      • = correlation of usage to operating metrics
      • = correlation of usage to improved business process
    • Measuring cross-fertilization (the extent to which people choose to go outside their community for information)
    • Number of new ideas/ rate of innovation
    • What’s the reduction in other forms of overhead activities (e.g., now that the subject matter expert is posting answers on a social platform, what is the resulting decline in repetitive e-mail requests?)
    • Percentage of profile completion
    • Rating content
    • Ability to determine a dollar value to participation
    • Where was the content reused, how was it reused, and what were the results of the reuse (e.g., cost savings, process improvement, etc.)
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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E2.0 Community Roles and Adoption Planning

Here are my notes from the second session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop:  Community Roles and Adoption Planning – A Critical Component of Org Change Management

Speakers:

  • Stan Garfield, Community Evangelist, Deloitte (@stangarfield)
  • Luis Suarez, Knowledge Manager, Community Builder and Social Software Evangelist, IBM (@elsua)

Background:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Notes:

[This session was billed initially as a cage match between Stan (advocating the gently  controlled, more organized approach to community building) and Luis (advocating a more liberal, uncontrolled approach).  However, Stan and Luis assured us beforehand that they will still behave collaboratively — in the true spirit of Enterprise 2.0.]

  • Disclaimers:
    • Focus:  Building communities of practice behind the firewall
    • The slides contain more than they can cover today, so checkout the deck on Slideshare
  • What is a Community?
    • Not everything is a Community
    • Just because you have a group of people, you don’t automatically have a community
  • What forms a Community? The members share a particular passion
  • Stan Garfield’s Community Manifesto (10 principles) – set out below is an excerpt from the Manifesto:
  • Communities should be independent. Participation should be voluntary.
  • There’s a difference among Communities, organizations and teams
    • Communities share passion, interests, expertise
    • Organizations are not voluntary
    • Teams are not voluntary (usually they are assigned); they are closed not open; often have a fixed mission and time period
  • Communities should span boundaries
    • The most dangerous thing you can do is to limit the scope of the community.  They should be as free form as they can reasonably be. [Luis prefers to talk about “facilitating” a community rather than “managing” a community.]
  • Requires a special level of engagement – providing the tools is not enough. The communities need to be nurtured constantly – every hour and every day.
  • Targets for managing communities
    • Types of communities
    • Activities should be used to explain to community members what it means to be a member and how they should participate
    • How to determine if a community really exists
    • What the community expects of its members
  • Community Circle of Life = as a community’s knowledge base grows, more people become members > a membership grows, the knowledge base becomes richer > as you connect members to content, you also help members connect with each other and build relationships > the easier it is for members to connnect, collaborate and grow, the richer they are and the more engaged they are.
  • Community Road Map
    • There’s a lot of work to be done before you can launch a community.  In fact, launching a community is the easy part. You need sustained effort and good leadership to nurture it.
    • Identify what content you want to provide.
    • Offer documentation and training for community members.
    • Begin developing a community site.
    • Once this is done, launch the site, build it out, add content and stimulate collaboration.
  • Stan and Luis have different experiences with community building.  Stan has found it helpful to gently control what communities can be formed to avoid redundancies and a loss of efficiency.  You can try to manage what communities form and how they build their community support.  The role of KM is really to assist and train rather than to control Luis says that communites are free-form and emergent.  They start as soon as a core group decides to launch one.  Over time, communities that cover similar topics tend to merge voluntary.
  • IBM has many community leaders who are willing to help other community leaders.  This peer training improves overall quality of communities.
  • Primary Community Roles
    • Executive sponsor – should lead by example
    • Community Leader
      • This is a critical role
      • This person should be a few steps ahead of the members
      • This person should be a real evangelist – they should help “lurkers” become active community members
    • Community Council
      • Advise the community leader in launching and sustaining the community
    • Community Members
      • Help provide content and recommendations regarding community development
  • How to build a community
  • Choose the topic around which the community will be form
    • Keep the topic broad so that it can span boundaries
    • It must be a compelling topic – enough to energize community members and keep them engaged.
  • Review existing community before creating a new one
    • This helps consolidate the knowledge base
    • It also tends to reduce the work for the community leaders
    • It brings new membership to an exisitng community
  • Select a communite moderator/facilitator
    • Watch the group carefully to see who has the right attributes to be the community moderator/manager
      • Who is a natural hub in the group/network?
      • Who is a subject matter expertise?
      • Who has the requisite passion? [But doesn’t have an axe to grind.]
      • Who has the energy to nurture the community?
      • Who encourages the engagment of members?
      • Who leads by example?
    • With a planned community, the executive sponsor should choose the community manager
  • How does the community manager regulate the content?
    • Most of the time, the community itself self-regulates and encourages members to do the right thing.
  • You can never communicate enough within the community
    • Continue to publicize the community’s existence.
    • Continue to recruit new members.
  • Keeping the community active
    • Have a regular call or other activity
    • Look for ways to bring within the community any sidebar discussions/activities
  • Q&A: What are the biggest challenges to Community Building?
    • There is a maximum number of communities a single person can follow.  How do you manage this to reduce information overload?
      • Encourage similar communities to merge
    • Alternatively, start with a broad community and let sub-communities emerge to focus on specialized topics.
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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Learn from the E2.0 Vanguard – Part 3

Here are my notes from the first session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop: Learn from the Vanguard

Speakers:

  • Megan Murray, Community Manager/Project Coordinator, Booz Allen Hamilton @MeganMurray
  • Jamie Pappas, E2.0 & Social Media Strategist, Evangelist, and Community Manager, EMC Corp @JamiePappas
  • Rawn Shah, Social Software Practices Lead, IBM @Rawn

Notes:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Rawn Shah: The Adoption Dance

  • It’s critical that you understand the people you are serving
    • Make it relevant to each person
    • You need to understand their pain points and interests
    • Speak plainly – use the language of your audience [NOT Geek Speak]
  • Market the good news
    • Collect and share success stories – “If they can do it, we can do it!”
      • They use surveys and interviews to find the stories
      • They store them in a series of slides and blog stories on their E2.0 platform
    • Build a collection over time to reflect a variety of scenarios at different points in the learning curve of your organization
  • Engage the Enthusiasts
    • Recruit volunteers as evangelists – they will advocate because they are passionate about the tools and opportunities
    • Remember that enthusiasts have views and their feedback shouldn’t be ignored
  • Look under the Leaves
    • A big part of the E2.0 Team’s work is to discover the people in the organization who can be helpful
    • Find the quiet folks who are using the tool and building an audience
    • If you support them, they will become evangelists
    • They provide critical support in highly local/particular circumstances
    • They can reach peers who may be beyond generic corporate communication
    • Accept that not every person will be an enthusiast
  • Reward Good Behavior
    • Financial rewards aren’t always the best
    • Focus on effective alternative reward:
      • Provide visibility through public acknowledgment
      • Provide opportunity
    • Calibrate the reward to the level of effort AND impact
  • Set Guidelines and Principles
    • This is not the same as governance – it’s about everyday user behavior
    • Let users know that this forum is not the place to start fights unnecessarily – focus on what’s important
    • Use a disclaimer to make clear what your constraints are
    • Set expectations of user behavior and make those expectation visible
    • Hold people accountable for their behavior
    • Encourage folks to be the first to respond constructively to their own mistakes – in fact, the E2.0 Team should lead by example here
  • Create Practice Spaces
    • Never underestimate how little most colleagues know about social media tools
    • Let folks work “in draft” privately  – at least initially – so that they can get use to the tool without fear of exposure/ridicule/reprimand
    • Create a safety zone for experimentation, but remind them that this is temporary – at some point they need to share with the network
    • Let them practice at their own pace, but provide all support necessary to help them progress
    • Forgive errors and offer help
  • Set a Rhythm, Practice Often
    • Set the rhythm of regular events early on (e.g., posting fresh content regularly)
    • The “Peacock” – Do a big show from time to time to capture user attention regarding these tools
    • The “Woodpecker” – You need to reiterate constantly to keep the message at the forefront – never stop reminding your colleagues of what they can do with these tools
  • Exercise:  Imagine a Success Story, then explain why it’s a story that needs to be publicized
    • Focus on keywords and active phrases
      • Led to a sale – impact on Top Line
      • Improved productivity and efficiency – impact on Bottom Line
      • Reduced time to bring product to market [great for a Pharma]
      • Accelerated decision-making time
      • “Haven’t felt this productive in a long time!”
      • Gives employees a voice and stake in the organization
      • Increased employment engagement leads to increased employee loyalty
      • This saved $X and Y amount of time
    • Focus on specific examples – so you have stories that resonate with every particular constituency within your organization
    • Once you have a collection of stories, create a case study to market your program and take it to the next level
      • Look for repeatable events – they make compelling case studies
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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Learn from the E2.0 Vanguard – Bonus Material

Here are my notes from the first session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop: Learn from the Vanguard

Speakers:

  • Megan Murray, Community Manager/Project Coordinator, Booz Allen Hamilton @MeganMurray
  • Jamie Pappas, E2.0 & Social Media Strategist, Evangelist, and Community Manager, EMC Corp @JamiePappas
  • Rawn Shah, Social Software Practices Lead, IBM @Rawn

Notes:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Exercise:  Doing a SWOT Analysis for Putting an E2.0 Plan Together

(This is for a hypothetical company)

  • Strengths
    • Executive sponsorship
    • Ability to address pain points successfully
    • Early adopters and grassroots support
    • Highly mobile, dispersed workforce
    • Organizational flexibility
    • A tightly organized company can also be good if it can encourage widespread adoption
    • A clear corporate strategy
    • Decent IT is in place
    • Mature business processes [can also be a weakness]
  • Weaknesses
    • Organizational culture focused on proprietary information
    • Working across multiple languages and geographies
    • Bridging multiple silos [both a weakness and an opportunity]
    • Obstinate managers/execs
    • Not understanding the possibilities
    • Low level of participation is misunderstood
    • Fear of change
    • Fear of information overload
    • An organization that is used to structured data may have trouble grappling with unstructured data
  • Opportunities
    • Crowdsourcing ideas
    • Cross-pollinating ideas across the organization
    • Bridging multiple silos
    • Creating loose ties that lead to useful relationships
    • Opportunity to bring your great external marketing to an internal audience
    • Enthusiasm of the employees
    • Collective intelligence leads to new business opportunities
    • Organization has the ability to better align IT resources to user needs
    • Keeping up [and exceeding] the Joneses
  • Threats
    • Resistant middle managers who don’t want to participate
    • Legacy applications and processes
    • “I want to do it my way”
    • Inability to scale and support growing use
    • Legal issues
    • Privacy issues
    • Competing initiatives
    • Competing vendor offerings
    • High use expectations
    • Fear of transparency / fear of being open
    • Handling inevitable organization change resulting from E2.0 use.
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Learn from the E2.0 Vanguard – Part 2

Here are my notes from the first session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop: Learn from the Vanguard

Speakers:

  • Megan Murray, Community Manager/Project Coordinator, Booz Allen Hamilton @MeganMurray
  • Jamie Pappas, E2.0 & Social Media Strategist, Evangelist, and Community Manager, EMC Corp @JamiePappas
  • Rawn Shah, Social Software Practices Lead, IBM @Rawn

Notes:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Megan Murray:  Planning for Adoption

  • Structure = the Taxonomy
  • Muscle = the Folksonomy
    • Should be living, flexible and visible
  • Staffing and Sourcing Your Team – Focus on the People
    • Who is involved on your E2.0 Team? What are their roles?
    • Include a variety of expertise/roles: e.g., IT for the tech; involve HR for knowledge about the people;  involve marketing to improve your communications.
    • What does change management mean for your organization? Marketing? Communications? [Impact on compensation?]
    • Do you have community managers and gardeners?  What level of weeding do you intend to do? What does your organization need?
  • Governance
    • Who will participate?
    • How will they govern?
    • How does the governance model reflect corporate concerns? [How does the governance model educate the organization regarding a different – but equally effective – way of operating that takes advantage of social media.]
    • Consider including FAQ or discussion board discussing questions and policy recommendations re: governance.
    • Engage experts to help answer and moderate these resources.
    • Make sure the experts are willing to engage and respond quickly.  This requires that they have both the information and authority to respond.
  • Policy
    • This is both a frightening and exciting issue.
    • What are your policies?  Who will enforce them?
    • On which issues can your organization evolve?
    • She believes that there is no new risk – just new opportunities for existing risks to flare up.
    • Start small and prove how the program mitigates risk.  This is better than trying to assuage concerns without current data/results.
  • Mitigation and Response
    • Brainstorm: what is the worst thing that could happen?
    • Brainstorm: what are the best responses to those possible disasters?
    • How do we balance the desire to keep open channels of communication with the concern for safety/risk aversion?
  • User Support – The Help Stack
    • Self-Help: give users the tools/info to fix things themselves
    • Create communities of users who can help each other – let them know how they can help themselves or find a peer to help.
    • Community Management – have someone available to help manage content, intervene when a problem arises, communicate fixes and improvements, highlight good user examples and success stories
  • The Help Desk
    • They will need specific training to support this changing tool
    • This isn’t a traditional IT tool when changes happen rarely and are well-publicized in advance.
  • Q&A: What would she have done differently?
    • Ask more questions of the users before starting
  • Q&A: What are the typical resistance points?
    • “Remind the lawyers they work for corporate.” [I think I should lodge a protest here!]
    • People hate change (most of the time) – this isn’t new.
    • Figure out at the beginning what the anticipated concerns are and then address them.
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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Learn from the E2.0 Vanguard -Part 1

Here are my notes from the first session of the Enterprise 2.o Black Belt Workshop: Learn from the Vanguard

Speakers:

  • Megan Murray, Community Manager/Project Coordinator, Booz Allen Hamilton @MeganMurray
  • Jamie Pappas, E2.0 & Social Media Strategist, Evangelist, and Community Manager, EMC Corp @JamiePappas
  • Rawn Shah, Social Software Practices Lead, IBM @Rawn

Notes:

[These are my quick notes, complete with  (what I hope is no more than) the occasional typo and grammatical error.  Please excuse those. Thanks!

From time to time, I’ll insert my own editorial comments – exercising the prerogatives of the blogger.  I’ll show those in brackets. ]

Jamie Pappas: Building the Business Case

  • Define clear goals that tie to the business strategy and resonate with the key stakeholders in your organization.
    • The goals should be measurable (for ROI purposes))
    • Goals should be realistic — under promise and over deliver
  • How does your social media tool address pain points that aren’t being addressed well currently.
    • Breaking down information silos and organizational silos that impede efficiency and efficacy
    • Identifying experts and connecting them to the rest of the organization
    • Will your initiative reduce redundancy?
  • Find some tangible use cases
  • Be realistic about the costs – it really isn’t free!
  • Find executive sponsors and key players within your organization
    • Ideally, they are already using social media tools and understand the potential (and actual) value they provide.
    • These folks can help answer the What’s In It For Me question.
    • They can spread the message at a peer-to-peer level, which can be much more influential than generalized blast messaging.
    • Reflect the feedback of these sponsors to ensure their continued support.
  • How to choose from all the tools available?
    • Try to satisfy 80% of your needs (don’t aim for 100%)
    • The tools should match your goals and address your pain points. Don’t adopt silo tools.
    • Don’t assume that the tool everyone else is using is right for your organization.
    • Start small. Be targeted. Then expand.
  • Never underestimate the need for education.
    • Not everyone knows how to use these tools – they need to be taught.

    Not everyone wants to play with the tool in order to learn how it works.

    • Not everyone understands the dynamics of E2.0 tools – e.g., folks who start a wiki may not realize that others can (and should) edit their work.
    • Be sure that users know what is expected of them.  Don’t focus on the don’ts. Do focus on what they should and could do.
    • Provide a variety of training to suit a variety of learning styles.
    • Make sure you “train the trainer” focusing on equipping the internal advocates to train their peers.
    • Include the training in all new hire training.
    • Exploit existing corporate training methods and channels.  Take advantage of every possible training opportunity.
  • Pitching the Idea – how to introduce the idea and who should you tell?
    • Focus first on your executive sponsor and key players
    • Consider who are the influencers, the advocates, the bit players for the purposes of this initiative.
    • Explain how they tools/program address the pain points.
    • Be very open to the feedback.
  • Common Objections:
    • “This stuff is not for business”
    • “Social collaboration is not work.”
    • “You expect us to pay our employees to socialize???”
    • “Great. One more tool to keep track of…”
    • “This is going to take way too much time to learn.”
    • “I don’t have anything to contribute.”
  • Dealing with the Critics
    • Acknowledge the concerns and then explain how the tool can help.
    • Engage in friendly dialogue – hostility will not advance your case.
    • Don’t be dismissive – often the initial criticism reflects a lack of education.  Seize the opportunity to educate and convert them.
    • Remember that this is not for everyone.  Very few tools are used by everyone equally.  You need to match tools to needs.
    • It takes a long time to achieve material levels of adoption.  Sometimes as much as 3-5 years.
    • The Ideal Rollout
    • Consider doing a soft launch rather than a highly marketed one.  Keep it small and let it go viral.
    • Try pilots.  Tell people not to tell others.  They won’t be able to contain themselves!  Result — viral spread.
    • Word of Mouth is the most powerful way to market.
    • Equip your sponsors and sponsors so that they can advocate for you and your program.
    • Keep the content fresh — people make snap judgments based on what they see.
  • What is Success?
    • How do you measure the impact and success?
    • Can they find what they need?
    • What are the levels of participation and feedback?
    • How do users feel about it?
    • Some Benefits to Suggest
    • Build institutional memory
    • Expertise location
    • Personal and professional growth
  • This is an Iterative Process
    • You can’t just do it once and forget about it.
    • You have to keep repeating your message
  • Exercise: Crafting an Elevator Pitch to Sell Your Program
    • Exercise:  Crafting an Elevator Pitch to Sell Your Program
    • Collect Anecdotes of success stories
    • Open with results
    • Focus on your audience’s “hot buttons”
    • Explain how the program will ACCELERATE corporate STRATEGY by tearing down silos, targeting innovation, tap in into  knowledge resources addressing out pain points.
  • Presentations:  www.e2conf.com/boston/2010/presentations/workshop
    • User name: Workshop
    • Password: Boston
  • Presentations also on Slideshare: http://slideshare.net/20adoption
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