Dan Linna: Preparing CIOs for the Law Firm of the Future #ILTACON

Session Description:

Disruptions in the legal industry are putting pressure on law firms to innovate and rethink how they deliver services in order to stay ahead. Learn about the people, processes, and technologies that law firms will need in the not-so-distant future and the measures and behaviors to put in place now to ensure your organization’s success.

Takeaways:

  • Futurist view of law firms and how they will deliver services.
  • Future role of the CIO.
  • People, processes and technologies that will be necessary for the law firm of the future.
  • Behaviors and measures to put in place now to prepare.

Speakers: xx

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • What will your law firm be doing in 10 years?  This is the first question you need to answer. Then, ask if you are hiring the right people (and training them) to achieve that reality?
    • you will need lawyers with new skills
      • technologically able, process-focused
    • you will also need developers, data scientists, project managers
  • The market. Over the last 10 years, there has been an increase in demand for legal services. However, demand for law firm services has been flat. This is because in-house corporate counsel are keeping more work for themselves and they have become more strategic about how (and from whom) they purchase legal services.
  • New providers. There are a variety of legal service providers. And now, United Lex has merged its professionals with the lawyers of LeClairRyan. These new approach
  • Legal Departments Priorities.
    • controlling outside counsel costs
    • driving work to outside counsel that demonstrate value. (This leads to the erosion of pedigree when what really matters is performance.)
    • Key attributes of winning law firms
      • solutions focus
      • quality of work
      • legal expertise
      • responsiveness
      • cost-efficiency
      • outcome vs expectation
      • low hourly rates counts, but it is the least important of these factors
  • Performance and Quality Matter. Research by AdvanceLaw indicated that on average the AmLaw 21-200 outperform the AmLaw 20.
  • Threats to law firm business. (According to Altman Weil)
    • corporate law departments are in-sourcing legal work
    • client use of technology
    • alternative legal providers
    • alternative law firms
  • Why are so few law firms changing?
    • Partners resist most change effortts
    • Most partners are unaware of what they might do differently
    • We are not in enough economic pain to motivate more significant change
    • clients aren’t asking for it
    • we lack time or organizational capacity
    • our service delivery model is not broken so we’re not trying to fix it
    • other law firms like ours are not changing
  • Legal Services Innovation Index. Catalogs law firm innovation and then index the work done by individual law firms. For more information see: https://www.legaltechinnovation.com/
  • How do you innovate? You need to focus significantly upon sustaining innovation. It’s not just about disruptive innovation
  • Three Types of Innovation (CapGemini):
    • 70% = core innovation
    • 20% = adjacent innovation
    • 10% – transformational innovation
  • Biggest Issues CIOs face today
    • security management
    • aligning IT initiatives with business goals
    • improving IT operations/systems performance
    • cultivating the IT / business partnership
    • cost control/expense management
  • Hurdles to digital transformation (CapGemini)
    • Cultural issues
    • presence of archaic IT systems and applications
    • lack of digital skilss
    • lack of clear leadership vision
  • Law Firm CIOs
    • Must be a strategic leader in your organization
      • how do you manage change?
      • how do you get others to buy into your ideas?
      • how do you lead up, down, across?
    • How do you contribute to a culture of innovation
  • Knowing the business
    • Law firm CIOs must know their clients’ business
      • External clients?
      • Internal clients?
        • Have you spent time developing relationships and rapport with firm lawyers?
        • Have you spent time understanding how they work?
  • Start with technology
    • EVERYONE is a technology company
  • Legal Technology
    • Basic — MS Office, metadata, eDiscovery, cloud computing, case management
    • Intermediate — document automation, expert systems
    • Advanced — machine learning, AI
  • What is artificial intelligence in law (today)?
    • Rules-driven AI  — expert systems, robotic process automation
    • Machine learning — Walmart is using Legalmation (to ingest complaints, draft a response and discovery questions) before engaging outside counsel
  • Why is so much legal work unstructured?
    • lack of standards and best practices
    • lack of metrics, including for qality
    • Why does it matter? You cannot automate chaos!
  • Steve Harman: We need to move legal services from Art to Science. Lawyers need to change from Artisans to Engineers.
  • How to approach this?
    • Focus on Process
      • disaggregate legal work
      • then figure out who is best postioned to deliver that work
      • systematic reengineering of work processes results in over a 50% improvement in performance
  • Toyota’s Improvement Kata
    • get the direction of challenge
    • grasp the current condition
    • ndefine ext target condition
    • experiment / test
  • 21st-Century T-Shaped Lawyer — able to function with the following skills:
    • Business of law
    • process improvement
    • project management
    • knowledge management
    • metrics data analytics
    • technology
  • For information on LegalRnD, check out YouTube.
  • See the Institute for the Future of Law Practice
    • mostly focused on jobs in corporate legal departments
  • What are law firms doing now?
    • some conversations with clients re: budget
    • some conversations about project staffing
    • some management visits to key clients
    • only 20% conduct post-matter reviews with clients
  • Action Items:
    • ask yourself: what will our firm be doing in 10 years?
    • put the client at the center
    • commit to disciplined continuous improvement and innovation
    • become data-driven
    • create a data plan
    • collaborate with clients, vendors, and law schools
    • identify new products & service to provide value to clients
    • go to Gemba! Embrace empathy!
Share

Robotic Process Automation: What CIOs Need to Know #ILTACON18

Session Description: Robotic Process Automation (RPA) gives CIOs the chance to help their firms rethink its business model. Beyond the cost savings, automation offers high value in the form of improvement in process efficiency, cycle time, productivity, quality, scalability, and governance and regulatory compliance. The value is easy to understand but there are important things to know as you move to automation in order to get it right and achieve the expected value. This session gives perspective on the value, goals, and best practices of RPA.

Speakers:

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • What is Robotic Process Automation?  Software that can be easily configured to do basic tasks across applications just as human workers do. RPA software is designed to reduce the burden of repetitive, simple tasks on employees. (Source: Investopedia)
  • It automates the actions of everyday users.
    • carry out repetitive processes within applications
    • configured by business users (no development or coding required!)
    • scalable workforce to meet variable demand — you can build more bots to satisfy increased workload, you can take them down when workloads decline
    • work within existing IT infrastructure — no integration required — just trigger a bot by emailing that specific bot (they each have their own email addresses at Seyfarth.)
  • What does RPA look like?
    • Every RPA implementation is different but there are common elements:
    • central management software for bots: blue prism, automation anywhere, UI path
    • Built for processes (time-consuming repetitive tasks)
    • Tackle time-consuming repetitive tasks
    • Bots do more than a macro/script — they can tackle an entire process
    • You get the most value when you deploy bots on an organization-wide basis. (You may want to start within a department first.)
    • You can create off-the-shelf bots or custom bots; you can layer bots on top of each other.
  • How do you identify and measure ROI?
    • Any high-volume, business-rules driven, repeatable process qualifies for automation
    • ROI factors
      • Processing time — start time/end time of a process
      • Productivity — length of time a human worker versus a bot takes to complete the task/process
      • Reduction of error rates — accuracy of bot output — neither bots nor humans are error-free but bots have a lower rate of error and can be stopped easily when they encounter trouble.
      • Redeployment — when bots can handle “reactive” processes, then the humans can focus on more proactive work
  • How is RPA different from AI. Automation technologies speed up or replace human decision making.
    • RPA and AI are on different ends of the continuum. RPA involves less complexity than AI.
      • On the RPA end = RPA and Rules Engine (where the rules are explicitly provided) — primarily works with structured data
      • On the AI end = machine learning (rules deduced by statistical techniques), natural language processing, deep learning, computer vision (using input from sensors) — primarily works with unstructured data
  • RPA is being used across all departments in all industries.
    • New business intake
    • Sending calendar reminders
    • Tax automation
    • IT asset management
    • Employee lifecycle (HR)
    • Finance/Accounting (help automate processes that transfer, aggregate, and report on data)
    • PDF creation for estate tax reporting purposes
  • Gillian Power: The inability of a bot to handles process ambiguity is an opportunity to clarify your process.
  • Seyfarth Shaw’s RPA experience.
    • Launched a RPA Center of Excellence. (This sits outside the IT department.)
    • They got the idea from seeing bots used in other industries and organizations
    • Deployed in Finance, Marketing, IT and Client-facing technology (e.g., extranet)
    • Utilized by various practice groups — initial proof of concept was in their immigration practice. They were able to convert a 25-minute human process into a 4-minute bot process.
  • Other things to consider
    • Security — the bots need credentials to get into your system so they are storing that information. What level of encryption protects this?
      • Be sure to work with your IT security team
    • On-going management, changes, staff, etc.
      • help the displaced humans shift to higher-value work
    • Negotiating strong agreements with vendor
      • work collaboratively with your IT department so you evaluate the new software and vendor in a systematic way
    • Protecting IP
    • Lessons learned
Share

Blockchain 101: It’s not just cryptocurrency #ILTACON18 #G009

Session Description: It’s the big buzzword now, but what are the basics that you need to understand to evaluate blockchain as a technology platform for you and your firm or department? Join us to learn about what blockchain is and why it matters. Learn why the importance of blockchain for the legal industry extends far beyond cryptocurrency. We will provide guidance about resources you can draw on to learn more about blockchain and to explore and develop your ideas for use cases.

Slides: [will be available after the conference]

Speakers:

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • What is Blockchain?  It is another form of a network comprised of software, servers and databases. (It’s just a bunch of code.)
  • Decentralized.
    • no central location for information — this isn’t running on Amazon Web Services
    • network = thousands or millions of computers and databases and users
    • uses the computing power of all computers to transmit (=speed) and store information (=volume)
    • If any one computer goes down, the network does not. Each computer is a “node.”
  • Immutable.
    • Information in a blockchain cannot be altered (except in specific circumstances) = it’s NOT immutable
    • it serves a largely permanent digital record of information
    • digital identity verification and authorization tool
    • provides transaction authenticity and a trusted transaction records
  • Public or “permissionless” blockchain.
    • completely open allowing anyone to join and participat (rea, send transaction to and expect to see them if they are valid)
    • to participate, all you have to do is download the relevant software. All this software is opensource.
    • the security of the information tends to be greater in the public blockchain than in a private blockchain
  • Private/hybrids or “permissioned” blockchain.
    • each of these have their own rules of the road
    • these rules determine how immutable the records really are — what proportion of members must agree before a record may be edited.
    • the smaller the blockchain, the higher the likelihood that it might fail
  • Differences.
    • Privacy
    • Scalability
  • Use Cases in the Legal Industry.
    • smart contracts — these are a series of “if, then” statements that automatically trigger agreed actions without further human action
    • financial services
    • supply chain management
    • identity management
    • voting — blockchain can help ensure one person/one vote by time stamping a record of voting in an immutable form
    • data/asset registries
    • any situation that involves a lot of data, a lot of parties (that may not trust each other completely), the need for accurate records of each transaction
    • early uses in legal
      • internal contract automation
      • contract and deal negotiaon (and auto-updating)
      • calendaring
      • document authentication
      • client identifiy management
      • transaction recordkeeping
      • automated billing
      • service of process verification
  • Examples of Platforms in Legal.
    • OpenLaw (running off Ethereum platform). They are hoping to create a GitHub for contracts
    • The Agreements Network
    • Intergra’s Blockchain for the Global Legal Industry
  • Legal Working Group Examples
    • Wall Street Blockchain Alliance
    • Ethereum Enterprise Alliance
    • Chamber of Digital Commerce — Smart Contracts Alliance
  • Government spending on Blockchain
    • States are moving to use blockchain for government and recording
    • Federal government blockchain spending is set to rise for the third straight year
  • Challenges — this is still a very young technology. The Bitcoin Whitepaper came out in 2008.
    • interoperability
    • regulations
    • scalability
    • energy
    • security risks
    • investment decisions
  • Legal Industry Impact
    • Delaware blockchain initiative — law allows creation/maintenance of corporate records on blockchain
    • West Virginia pilot tested election voting by deployed military — they are using biometrics to validate identify
    • Vermont law approves blockchain data as court admissible
    • Illinois Blockchain initiative
      • medical credentialing process project
      • blockchain in government tracker
      • birth registration pilot project
    • Clients in the Logistics Industry are already pursuing blockchain (Blockchain in Transportation Alliance)
    • Store deal records on the blockchain (not on CDs or in bound volumes)
    • Typical legal functions and the vendors/technologies that use blockchain to support these functions
      • Document management system – -NetDocs, Integra Ledger
      • Document assembly — Thomson Reuters Contract Express, Integra Ledger
      • Document templates for smart contracts — OpenLaw, Ethereum
      • Contract management using smart contracts — Monax’s Agreements Network
      • Document execution, existence – -Basno, Blocksign
      • Notary services — SilentNotary, Ethereum
      • Service of Process — ServeManager
  • Groups working on legal industry opportunities
    • Global Legal Blockchain Consortium (Association of Legal Administrators)
      • ALA has developed the universal process billing codes
      • Standards of Alliance for the Legal Industry (SALI)
    • OpenLaw — they are creating learning tools to help any lawyer develop smart contracts
      • this is a Consensus Project
    • Accord Project
  • Top 10 Industries impacted by Blockchain
    • Banking (FinTech)
    • Healthcare (e.g., processing insurance claims)
    • Government
    • Real Estate
    • Legal
    • Security
    • Politics
    • Rentals and Ride Sharing
    • Charities and Aid Organizations
    • Education
  • What are the Big Four Doing?
    • Deloitte says that if your company is not already looking at Blockchain then you are planning to fail
    • PwC has developed an audit tool for blockchain
    • Accenture is viewed as the  third largest blockchain vendor behind IBM and Microsoft
  • What are the prospects? Gartner says by 2030, this will be a $3.1 trillion industry
Share

Lisa Bodell Keynote: Why is Change so Hard? #ILTACON

Session Title and Description: Kill the Company: End the Status Quo, Start an Innovation Revolution

What holds you back from better innovating, every day? In too many organizations, we’re stuck in the land of status quo. We’ve forgotten how to think differently, and lack the simple tools to solve problems creatively. The very structures put in place to help organizations grow are now holding us back. This keynote is an inspirational call to arms: to start a revolution in how we think and how we work.

Speaker: Lisa Bodell, Founder and CEO of futurethink

[These are my notes from the International Legal Technology Association’s 2018 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • How to detect change?  How do you keep your antennae up to detect signals of change so you can respond to possible, probable, and preferable scenarios.
  • What we say do and what we actually do are different. We can learn a lot from the gap. Wearables can track mood and actual activity. The challenge is to understand how this affects the customer and employee experience. Equally challenging: what concerns does this raise?
  • “The future is not who you ARE. The future is who you are BECOMING.”  If you are forward-looking you can influence the future rather than have it inflicted on you.
  • Partnerships are Key. Partner with the people who scare you the most. That partnership will force you into new ways of thinking and doing.
  • Practice Proactive Obsolescence. Palgrave Macmillan has set up a venture fund to invest in businesses that will put old-school publishing out of business. This means that they get in on the ground floor of their replacements.
  •  Why don’t we respond to change? Complexity & complacency. Most people spend the bulk of their days at work in meetings and doing email. (This is not inspiring.) It drives them to their to-do lists, it focuses them on the mundane.  Then they slide into complacency. These people cannot think about the future, they cannot think about change.
  • What do we value? What do we reward?
    • More vs Less
    • Doing vs Thinking
    • Internal vs External
  • “Thinking is a Daring Act.”  It requires alone time and quiet time.
    • The brain is an incredible organ. It starts working from the moment you wake up and doesn’t stop until you enter your office!
  • How open to change is your organization? Count how many times you can answer yes to the following questions:
    • People in our organization actively push the boundaries of what’s seemingly possible and apply critical thinking to all parts of our work
    • Our employees are comfortable asking provocative and sometimes unsettling questions to stretch thinking
    • When faced with challenges, our people can think on their feet and nimbly change direction
    • Our employees do not easily give up their ides when encountering adversity, and generally see them through
    • We’re constantly looking forward to the next 5-10 years, and actively seek solutions on how to stay ahead
    • We purposefully hire people with diverse backgrounds and create project teams with a variety of disciplines and experiences.
    • We look at what other industries adjacent or unrelated to ours are doing. We apply their best practices to our work.
    • We always encourage people to eliminate redundancies, rules, and processes that create complexity, so they can focus on more important work.
    • How many times could you answer Yes?
      • 1-2  = status quo
      • 3-5 = risk taker
      • 6-8 = change maker
  • Your job as a leader is to reduce the friction.  This means eliminating the hurdles (e.g., processes, assumptions, practices) that stop your team from doing great work.
  • The key is to ask killer QUESTIONS. In earlier times, the focus was on finding the right answer. However, today you can find the answer to any question. (Google has an answer to any questions.) The key is to ask the RIGHT question.
  • Kill Stupid Rules. Focus on your sphere of control. (But don’t touch rules that are in place to ensure regulatory compliance.) Ask your team: what two stupid rules we should eliminate? They will show you the things that get in their way and slow them down.
  • Empower Decision-Making. Be willing to let your team make decisions. Support the decisions they make. And then find useful things to do with your new-found free time.
  • How to fix your focus?
    • Ask yourself and your team to create a list of their Typical Tasks
    • Then ask them to strike out the things on that list that are a waste of time
    • Next, ask them to create a list of Desired Work. Then strategize with them on how to shift their focus to the work that actually expands opportunity for themselves and their organization.
  • Concrete ways to gain more time
    • Kill stupid meetings
    • change the frequency of meetings
    • NNTR = type “no need to respond” in the subject line or body of an email. This will reduce the number of unnecessary emails.
    • “Cut the crap committee” = this volunteer committee identifies things that can be eliminated so everyone can focus on the things that matter.
  • You can kill stupid rules. You can kill stupid meetings. You CANNOT kill stupid people.
Share

From KM Treadmills to KM Windmills and Beyond

A treadmill in a gym can do you a world of good. A KM treadmill, however, can put you in a world of hurt.

What’s a KM treadmill? That’s a question Chris Boyd (Senior Director of Professional Services at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati) and I addressed earlier this week during ILTA’s remarkable hybrid webinar session that linked simultaneous live meetings of ILTA members in eight cities: Boston, New York City, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Palo Alto, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Toronto. In our presentation (which reprised our highly interactive session at ILTACON 2017), we identified the following characteristics of a KM treadmill:

  • it takes dedicated attention and effort to run the program
  • it stops when your attention and effort stop
  • it often involves a great deal of manual labor
  • it usually requires nagging
  • your KM team dreads it

Does this sound familiar? When researching KM treadmills in preparation for our session, we discovered that far too many “traditional” law firm KM projects were, in fact, pure treadmills. Is it any wonder many law firm KM professionals are frustrated?

So what works better? We have a few suggestions:

KM Windmills

KM Windmills are not dependent solely on the efforts of your KM team. Rather, they find and use existing “energy sources” within the firm that others create and maintain. What types of energy sources do they leverage?

  • existing processes (e.g., new business intake process, pitch preparation process, etc.)
  • existing roles (e.g., having secretaries maintain practice group content)
  • existing technology (e.g., using experience-tracking database to augment precedent and expertise location, enterprise search that leverages existing knowledge stores, etc.)

Because they rely on energy sources that are prized and supported by other parts of the business, these KM programs can share the burden of maintenance and support with those other parts of the business. Of course, the more valuable that energy source is to the business, the less likely it is that your overworked KM team will have to shoulder the laboring oar.

KM Infinite Energy Machines

Moving from a portfolio of KM projects that are primarily treadmills to one comprised mainly of windmills makes a great deal of sense. It allows your KM team to do more with less by collaborating with other successful teams and projects within the firm. If you have managed to achieve this, pat yourself on the back.

Nonetheless, I would be remiss if I didn’t hold out the possibility of something even better: the KM infinite energy generator.  Extrapolating from the Buttered Cat paradox, a KM infinite energy generator is a KM system or project that produces such useful results that its main beneficiaries (outside the KM team) feel compelled to use it more and contribute even more to its continued success. And, the bigger it grows and the more it is used, the better it gets. Twenty years ago, this would have sounded like pure science fiction. However, we are seeing with machine learning the reality of computerized systems that learn from their own processes and then improve those processes.

Sustainable KM

If you are prepared to think differently about your knowledge management efforts, consider developing a sustainable KM program. Just like we have sustainability management in other sectors to reduce damage to the environment, a KM sustainability program aims to optimize KM efforts so that they achieve the highest benefits with the lowest collateral damage possible. For those interested in learning more about this healthier approach to KM, see my earlier article, Sustainable KM (in Thomson Reuters’ Practice Innovations, July 2016).

But wait, there’s more

During both this week’s hybrid webinar and last summer’s ILTACON session, the best part was the table discussions during which attendees shared their treadmill frustrations and their remarkable windmill successes. We learned of some innovative ways law firm KM teams have found to harness the winds of their firms in order to make their KM programs more efficient. This was a reminder that the oldest and most effective way to share knowledge is through conversation. We’re delighted that these sessions provided the impetus for some really helpful knowledge exchange.

[Photo Credit: Rhododendrites]

Share

How KM Enables Innovation #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description: 

Most companies struggle to find ways to embed innovation into their business. This talk shares the journey of establishing a grassroots movement—a journey fueled by innovation, knowledge sharing, and learnings, and the critical success factors discovered along the way.

Speakers:

  • Wendy Woodson, Director, Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Kim Bullock, #innovation Catalyst, ExxonMobil

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • How They Approach Innovation.  There are multiple kinds of innovation — not just transformational, game-changing innovation. Instead, they use the following model [see Managing Your Innovation Portfolio]
    • Transformational Innovation
    • Adjacent Innovation — taking what you do well and moving into a new market
    • Core Innovation — improving your bread and butter functions — this area is ripe for smart KM
  • Brutal Truths:
    • Culture & Behaviors. These beliefs and behaviors are so deeply ingrained in the organization that they can be extremely difficult to identify and excavate, much less reform.
    • Politician & Magician. We are always selling (politician), we’re always performing (magician).
    • Art not Science. There is not a single best approach to innovation. The key is to find business problems worth solving and then working with the affected group to improve their situation. The speakers spoke about a project they did to reduce the burden of exception reporting from  70% of the avaialble time to 30% of available time. This translated into a significant improvement in the quality of life.
    • Warrior. We have to be very thick-skinned and ready to fight for attention, for support, for successful projects. KM often is considered a “nice to have” rather than a “need to have.”
  • Opportunity. For all of the brutal truths, the speakers believe that there is tremendous opportunity in KM for rewarding work.
  • Critical Success Factors.
    • External Network. Just as you create your internal network within your organization, intentionally create an external network that can be the source help, information, and commiseration.
    • Brutal Truths. Be honest about the Brutal Truths discussed above. And be very forthright about your projects and progress. And be very honest with your leadership. They need to know.
    • The Middle Matters. We usually tend to start by looking for support from senior champions or at the grassroots level. However, the middle managers are influencers who often are ignored. The speakers focused on the middle managers — they were explicit about exactly what they expected in terms of influencing up and influencing down.
    • Attention, Attraction, Adoption.
      • Attention — use standard marketing tactics to get their attention
      • Attraction — explain what you are offering and how you can help
      • Adoption — get down to brass tacks, find an issue you can work on with the business, get it done, and then repeat.
    • Tell the Story. Rather than just insisting that KM is good, collect and share the success stories. Capture them in an article, record videos. Both of these are more contagious that assertions by KM.
Share

Industry Leaders Conversation: Change, Culture, and Learning #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

Former head of KM with the BBC, Semple believes in conversations and leads our panel on a far-ranging discussion of change, culture and learning as we all aspire to an outbreak of common sense on our journey for knowledge sharing and creating sustainable, high-functioning organizations and communities.

Speakers:

  • Euan Semple, Director, Euan Semple Ltd
  • Jean-Claude Monney, Former Chief Knowledge Officer, Microsoft, Columbia University and Digital Transformation Coach
  • Kim Glover, Global Manager of Knowledge Management, TechnipFMC
  • Nancy Dixon, Principal Researcher, Common Knowledge Associates

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Why knowledge management?
    • at Microsoft Services, Jean-Claude Monney was given responsibility to get 100% of Microsoft knowledge to 100% of Microsoft’s customers, 100% of the time.
    • Best of the knowledge = relevant (in the context of the work) and trustworthy
    • For Nancy Dixon, knowledge management helps the organization learn better and faster.
  • What is the pedigree of knowledge?
    • if the knowledge comes from a person, is that person reliable/trustworthy?
    • if the knowledge comes from a document, is the source of the document reliable?
  • Knowledge management should focus on the issues that matter.
    • Nancy Dixon worries that KM focuses too much on the tactical (how to be more efficient) but misses the issues that can really bring down the organization, such as ethical issues.
    • General Motors once had a terrific KM group. However, they were unable to help the company prevent bankruptcy. What if there were a KM group at Volkswagon that could shed light on ethical issues? Would that have prevented the emissions control disaster? Would there have been a different outcome at Wells Fargo if there were a KM-organized forum for employees to express their concerns about business practices that did not align with the company’s mission statement?
  • Conversation is Consequential. 
    • Conversation is something you enter with the realization that you might be changed.
    • Conversation in an organization creates a culture — it is important to notice what is talked about AND what is not talked about.
    • An organization that wants the benefit of consequential conversation must first create an environment of psychological safety.
  • We Make Culture.
    • Culture is not just something that is something that is done to us. We make culture by everything we do (or do not do).
    • We learn culture in the first instance from our experiences with our direct managers.
  • How to Start a KM Program.
    • If you are lucky, the CEO comes in one day and says we need a KM program.
    • More likely, find business problems that KM can help solve.
    • When you are asked to “show them the money,” don’t assume the responsibility for the numbers. Instead, partner with the business first, find out what KPIs are important to them, and then figure out the value KM adds to achieve those KPIs.
    • Before you mention KM to anyone, collect stories of instances when one unit helped another unit (and how much money was solved). Then suggest to management that you create an organizational strategy out of this collaboration.
  • What’s Next for KM?
    • Monney:
      • We are experiencing a massive change due to digital augmented knowledge. The reality of AI and augmented reality is extraordinary. The key is to use AI to improve a human’s ability to make better decisions.
      • We need to figure out to digitally transform our business — or someone else will.
      • We need to develop empathy
      • We need to harness the source of knowledge — but what if the knowledge is the heads of contractors or people who do not want to be handcuffed to the organization.
    • Glover: As technology gets better and easier to use, KM professionals can go back to being “people people” rather than reluctant technologists.
    • Dixon: There is an erosion of cognitive authority. We have stopped trusting CEOs and other people in positions of authority. KM’s role is to make things more transparent so that we can operate without omniscient authority figures.
Share

Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast — or Does it?

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast,” famously attributed to the late business guru Peter Drucker, perfectly states the need for an organization’s culture to be aligned with its strategic objectives for there to be any hope of fully realizing them. Culture is tribal and pervasive. And, it can vary depending on the group, environment, or objectives. But, this powerful and often unconscious set of forces that influences both individual and collective behavior can be harnessed to drive culture change and reinforce shared values within an organization or project team. Speakers explore examples of “epic culture fails” resulting from strategy that neglected the cultural component, then impart seven tips to drive outcomes that leverage culture to support organizational- or project-based strategy. These tactics can be used to support a company or project team’s core values and culture while creating synergies with strategic initiatives and shortening the time to adoption. Aligning the strategy of whatever it is you are trying to do with the culture of whoever it is you are working with is paramount. It can mean the difference between success and failure. Culture doesn’t have to eat strategy for breakfast; they can be harnessed together to create organizational strength and a better overall customer outcome.

Speakers:

  • Kim Glover, Global Manager of Knowledge Management, TechnipFMC
  • Tamara Viles, Manager of Knowledge Architecture, TechnipFMC

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

Session Slides: 

Viles & Glover – C202_Viles.pptx
Glover & Viles – C202_Glover(1).pptx

NOTES:

  • Value Moment.
    • A Value Moment =
    • Today’s Value Moment: Knowledge Mangement needs to be just in time, just for me, and just what I need.
  • Culture.
    • Culture is critical if you want to execute your strategy.
    • Culture = how we do things around here
    • It is an unconscious set of forces that influence individual and group actions
    • Ed Schein is the considered the father of culture. He wrote Organizational Culture and Leadership, and the Corporate Culture Survival Guide.
      • What is Culture?
        • Structures and Process: the visible layer of culture, the observable artifacts
        • Espoused Values: the stated mission, how the organization talks about itself internally and externally.
        • Real Culture: the basic assumptions of an organization — what the group has learned over time from its successes and failures. These assumptions, ideas, even pictures need to be challenged and replaced if you want to change the culture. These are the unwritten rules.
    • Examples of strong organizational culture
      • Starbucks
        • Structures & Process: their observable artifacts (the way they look, they way they work) are strong and consistent
        • Espoused Values: they buy fair trade coffee, they recycle, they hire veterans
    • Culture reinforces itself by promoting people who live by the organization’s unwritten assumptions and beliefs.
  • Epic Culture Fails.
    • Wells Fargo is currently suffering an enormous gap between the organization’s stated mission and their culture.
    • AT&T/AOL Time Warner merger — early reports indicate that the two companies have radically different cultures. And they have fairly negative assumptions/beliefs about each other.
    • Hollywood is suffering a huge gap between stated values and actual culture/behaviors.
  • Components of Great Culture.
    • Clear Vision and Strategy: Volvo has an unambiguous commitment to safety that they have built on over decades.
    • Shared Values: Your actions must align with your words. (Walking the talk.)
    • Common Practices: Your processes must align with your strategy and values.
    • Engaged People: According to Monster.com, departments with healthy culture have 30% less turnover in staff.
    • Common Narratives: Positive stories that celebrate and strengthen an organization’s unique culture.
    • Reinforcing Physical Environment: Physical surroundings that align with and support the culture.
  • Tips and Tricks for Healthy Culture.
    • Seize every opportunity to reinforce your culture.
    • Assess your culture before creating your strategy. Will they be mutually supportive?
    • What you reward is what you will get.
    • Collect and share stories that support your culture.
    • Identify your champions and evangelists
    • Keep people engaged by making work fun.
    • Build on the familiar by integrating new things with existing practices.
    • Make the invisible visible: provide help and support — connect the dots so people can find what they need and share what they know.
Share

Intuition and Bold Risk-Taking for Breakthrough Innovation and Growth #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Title and Description: 

Maia Marken explores different ways of thinking, from professional poker and chess players to provoke, challenge, and inspire business leaders. In discussion with professional poker player Alec Torelli, she looks at the interplay between analytics and intuition in decision making in today’s workplace. They talk about a high-stakes game that ended in a surprise that all the math experts would not have expected because Torelli relied on his intuition. In a world full of data-driven decision making, is intuition dead? They explore this idea and its applications to business decision making. Marken and chess grandmaster Sam Shankland then explore the concept of bold risk-taking through a discussion of the 1972 chess championship between Boris Spassky and Bobby Fischer, who took the entire chess world by storm when he opened with a new move, C4, despite a lifetime of having successfully played E4 as his opening move. While this move caught Spassky by surprise and demonstrated Fischer willingness to play in Spassky’s turf, it also was an objectively smart move, as Fischer went on to win the match. This and other case studies share lessons from chess and business on bold risk-taking.

Speakers:

  • Alec Torelli, Professional Poker Player
  • Sam Shankland, Professional Chess Player
  • Maia Marken, Chief of Staff, Worldwide Services Strategy, Cisco

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Sam Shankland: Bold Risk-Taking.
    • By his own admission, Shankland (an Olympics-level chess player) is a risk-taker in chess and in life.
    • Bold Risk-Taking can be a brilliant move — provided that your bold risk is an intelligent risk. Shankland described how Bobby Fischer abandoned his favorite opening move (C4 move), which his opponent, Spassky, expected, and used instead Spassky’s favorite opening move (E4). This was an intelligent risk because it had the benefit of surprise and completely threw his competitor of his game.
    • Use your intuition to choose which risks to take AND the right moment in which to take the chosen risk.
    • How does this apply to your work? Maia Marken says that her team challenges each other’s thinking by asking if a suggested action is your C4 move (the favorite, usual thing) or your E4 move (a bold risk for you).
  • Alec Torelli: Intuition
    • Torelli is a professional poker player and coach.
    • The relationship between logic and intuition at the poker table:
      • [You can find a video of these on YouTube on Torelli’s channel.]
      • You need to use logic AND intuition in harmony — don’t rely on just one or the other.
      • Intuition informs your assumptions, which you then test through logic.
    • To strengthen intuition, pay attention to the clues that the other humans in the game are providing. Learn to interpret those clues (based on rigorous pattern recognition). In 1502, Da Vinci intuited that a suspension bridge could be built. To support his insight, he did the math to demonstrate the necessary calculations. He then proposed this to the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire whose engineers were unanimous that this bridge could not be built. It wasn’t until 2001 that an engineering team was able to build Da Vinci’s bridge — in Norway.
  • How to get more skillful in taking risks?.
    • Practice makes it better, reflection makes it perfect. You can understand the theory of risk-taking but until you practice over and over, you won’t master the skill. And a critical part of that practice is reflection: examining what happened and why — when you lose AND when you win.
    • Separate yourself from the outcome — just focus on the process. This means removing the emotion related to the outcome and objectively make the best decision you can make with the information you have in the moment.
  • How to improve your judgment?
    • Check your ego at the door. After all, even the best professional poker players in the world lose 30% of the time. Therefore, never assume you are infallible. Instead, use every opportunity to improve.
    • Be open to learning.
    • Have someone in your life who calls you on your BS. (Torelli says his wife is invaluable for this!)
Share

Making a Digital Workplace Work #KMWorld

KMWlogo_Stacked_Session Description:

For 11 years, the global Intranet and Digital Workplace Awards have uncovered and shared remarkable solutions. This year is no exception! See the best of this year’s winners from the U.S., Europe, and beyond. They range from small ideas to entire platforms, giving something for everyone to take away. Ismail discusses the challenges of developing a rigorous and robust, efficient and effective digital workplace environment in a multi-cultural, decentralized organization and what means and methods can be used to create a viable digital workplace. A variety of different tools are recognized, such as the intranet, internal and external collaboration platforms, and enterprise search.

Speakers:

  • James Robertson, Founder, Step Two
  • Carlos Pelayo, Director, Lead IT Business Partner for Communications and Public Affairs, Shire
  • David M. Feldman, Associate Director Collaboration, Shire
  • Brian Duke, Senior Manager, Intranet Solutions, Thermo Fisher Scientific

[These are my notes from the KMWorld 2017 Conference. I’m publishing them as soon as possible after the end of a session, so they may contain the occasional typographical or grammatical error. Please excuse those. To the extent I’ve made any editorial comments, I’ve shown those in brackets.]

NOTES:

  • Fisher Scientific.  [Here is a link to their slides, including screenshots]
    • Following the example of consumer apps, they put their Yammer feed front and center on their intranet page. They did not shove it over on the side or hide it behind a link.
    • They are using Microsoft Flow to automatically post content to designated feeds.
    • They use tyGraph to collect and display their Yammer usage metrics
    • Of the 38K activated Yammer accounts, 31K were active on the intranet in the last month.
  • Shire. Governance First Intranet [Here is a link to their slides, including screenshots]
    • They found it really helpful to start with governance, rather than touching on it at the end of the intranet project
    • This project came out of an acquisition — Shire acquired a much larger organization. They grew from 7K to 23K employees.
    • They started by looking at the problems in the various legacy systems.
    • They wanted to reuse as much of the content as possible from the legacy systems.
    • As much as possible, they want to configure rather than customize
    • They gave people the freedom to do what they wanted — but within predetermined guardrails.
    • They used Microsoft Office 365
    • They created a consistent look and feel across all devices by using custom-branded webparts.
Share