Above and Beyond KM A discussion of knowledge management that goes above and beyond technology.

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This publication contains my personal views and not necessarily those of my clients. Since I am a lawyer, I do need to tell you that this publication is not intended as legal advice or as an advertisement for legal services.
  • Managing the Fire Hose

    People talk about the velocity of current flows of information and inputs and say it’s like drinking from a fire hose.  That’s wishful thinking.  On far too many days, it feels more like living in the Lower Ninth Ward during Hurricane Katrina.  For Clay Shirky, that sense of drowning in information is a sure sign not of overload but, rather, of inadequate filters.  If he’s right (and I think he is), we have to find a better way of coping.

    A great deal of daily life now consists of filtering and managing the inputs so that we can be productive.  For me, this is a matter of personal knowledge management:  the art of gathering, organizing, storing, searching and retrieving the information we need to live well.   I’m an avid  student of the subject and have discovered that one never quite masters it.  There is always a new challenge and always something to learn.  So I thought I would collect some resources in this post for myself and any others who are seeking a slightly saner way of managing the fire hose.

    Gathering Information:

    • People First – If you’re looking for reliable information, you need not look any further than your friends and trusted colleagues.  Building your social network and ensuring you have accurate contact information will go a long way to helping you find what you need when you need it.  Once you know who is in your trusted network, how do you tap it?  Social media tools such as Twitter, Facebook and FriendFeed help you stay in touch and share information you consider interesting or important.  The beautiful thing is that when you use your social networks to gather information, your friends do the filtering for you.
      • See the quick tutorial in the Common Craft video:  Social Networking in Plain English
      • Twitter does much more than simply provide updates on your friends.  It can also be a great research tool.  However, it all starts with connecting online and here is a Common Craft video to explain how:  Twitter in Plain English
    • Let the Information Come to You – Through the magic of electronic subscriptions and web feeds (e.g., Really Simple Syndication (RSS)), you no longer have to go hunting for current information.  It will come to you.  All you have to do is place your order — and that just takes a couple of clicks of your mouse — and then sit back and wait for the content to be sent to your e-mail inbox or your RSS reader (e.g., Google Reader).
      • See the quick tutorial on how RSS readers work and how to subscribe in the Common Craft video:  RSS in Plain English.

    Organizing Information:

    • Create a Personal Archive – When I first started practicing law, each lawyer would create an elaborate set of folders (aka the “form file”) that housed every piece of paper that seemed interesting.  That’s where you stored precedent documents, research results, notes, etc.  The idea was that you created a private archive of useful information designed to help you work more efficiently.  We still need personal archives, but today they consist primarily of electronic content.  And, given how cheap electronic storage has become, there really are not many physical limits on how large your personal archive can be.
    • Organize Your Electronic Materials Electronically – A few years ago hand held label makers were all the rage.  They allowed you to create the illusion of order despite the underlying chaos of your system.  An electronic storage system can be every bit as chaotic and electronic labels every bit as illusory.  However, employed properly (according to a scheme that makes sense to you and that you diligently apply in a consistent fashion), these electronic labels can help you organize enormous amounts of information.  You can apply these labels via a variety of Google applications (e.g., Bookmarks, Mail, Reader, etc.) or through social bookmarking, as discussed in the next section.
    • Let Others Help You Organize Information – through social bookmarking tools (e.g., Delicious), you can enjoy the benefits of the organizational efforts of others.  When they identify interesting content and label that content electronically, that creates an organizational scheme that is available to anyone else who is interested in that content.

    Storing Information:

    • People Information – In the olden days, all you needed was a simple address book (hard copy or electronic).  Now, just sign up to that giant rolodex in the sky known as LinkedIn and let others take care of keeping contact information up to date for you.
      • For information on how LinkedIn works, see this Common Craft video:  What is LinkedIn?
    • Electronic Storage Only – Don’t store information in hard copy unless it is something you really need at hand in a physical format.  Otherwise, store it all online.  If you don’t have concerns about information security, store it remotely in an externally-hosted blog or wiki, or via Google or any other comparable service provider.
    • Minimize the Number of Storage Sites – Remember that old paper form file?  The great thing was that it was the only place you had to check for information you had saved.  Now, you have to check your e-mail folders, the favorites on your web browser, your social bookmarks, your hard drive, etc.  Stop the Madness! Try to consolidate as much as you can in just one or two places online so that you don’t have to search over and over again for the information you have saved.
    • Make Your Personal Archive Portable – If you work exclusively at the office,  relying on a hard copy form file is still feasible (barely).  But if you have lots of electronic information you need to keep, then putting it in a paper file is neither convenient nor considerate of the environment.  Further, if you’re ever working at a client’s office, at home or in a hotel, you won’t have access to those paper files and then you’ll understand why so many of us believe in the value of a portable electronic archive that is accessible anywhere you have an internet connection.  And, given today’s economic realities, I should mention that having a portable personal archive means that if you should ever part company with your current employer, you can keep the archive you’ve built up so carefully, provided it is outside your employer’s firewall.  (Obviously, client confidential information should not be stored outside the firewall, but information you obtain publicly via the internet is yours to store and organize outside the firewall.)

    There you are — an introduction to some personal knowledge management information and techniques.  Try them out and see what works for you.  And if you have other suggestions for effective personal KM, please leave a comment below and let us all know.

    [Photo Credit:  Anxious223, Creative Commons license]

    Published on February 27, 2009 · Filed under: Personal KM, Social Media, social networks; Tagged as: , , , , , ,
    15 Comments
  • http://twitter.com/dagb dagblakstad

    I love this article, no less. I have also blogged on the subject, but not nearly as thoroughly on why it is so important and how to accomplish it.

    Knowledge workers must learn the tools, and get this way of managing information right under their skin so gets a natural way of working.

    Guess I am more of a doer than thinker on this subject.

  • VMaryAbraham

    Thanks so much, Dag. You're absolutely right about how useful it is for knowledge workers to learn this way of working early. The key is lots of education and helpful support when people backslide (as we all do!). Once individuals are effective personal knowledge workers, then the larger organization will realize great benefits.

    - Mary

  • Wendy Reynolds

    Thank you for this Mary – a concise, articulate list of tools and reasons to use them. I would add that LinkedIn is becoming useful as a source of answers to specific questions. I've had greater success polling my colleagues on LinkedIn groups than I have posting questions to blogs or Twitter.

  • http://www.compliancebuilding.com Doug Cornelius

    Mary -

    You know I have been a fan of the 2.0 approach to knowledge management. The focus is on delivering useful (and easy to use) tools to help people organize their personal knowledge. That they happen to be open to the public and help the larger organization is merely a by product.

    Early KM focused on helping the larger organization, not the individual, organize its knowledge.

  • VMaryAbraham

    Doug -

    You and I are definitely preaching to the choir. We've experienced the benefits that Web 2.0 tools bring to personal knowledge management efforts.

    - Mary

  • VMaryAbraham

    Thanks for letting me know about your positive experience with LinkedIn, Wendy. I've taken a look at the groups, but haven't yet found a good point of entry. Too many of the questions/discussions seem oriented to vendors.

    - Mary

  • http://www.jasperassociates.co.uk Marshall Potts

    I found this extremely interesting looking at KM from a personal networking and management perspective.

    One of the problems where Knowledge Management is concerned is that there are so many ways of describing what it is and how it is managed.

    From an organizational point of view rather than personal – technology, information storage and retrieval and document management systems can swamp an organizations understanding of how to manage knowledge to its best effect.

    I work with a number of experts involved with the KM Institute http://www.kminstitute.org/cms/index.jsp and who are members of my Virtual Enterprise Network.

    I have a blog with a definition of KM in the context of organizations if you would like to comment on KM you are welcome.

    http://www.jasperassociates.co.uk/wordpress/

  • http://www.jasperassociates.co.uk Marshall Potts

    I found this extremely interesting looking at KM from a personal networking and management perspective.

    One of the problems where Knowledge Management is concerned is that there are so many ways of describing what it is and how it is managed.

    From an organizational point of view rather than personal – technology, information storage and retrieval and document management systems can swamp an organizations understanding of how to manage knowledge to its best effect.

    I work with a number of experts involved with the KM Institute http://www.kminstitute.org/cms/index.jsp and who are members of my Virtual Enterprise Network.

    I have a blog with a definition of KM in the context of organizations if you would like to comment on KM you are welcome.

    http://www.jasperassociates.co.uk/wordpress/

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